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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 06/18/2019 in all areas

  1. 33 points
    The rock guys remain completely untouched by the Me Too movement. In part because it was always part of their persona’s in the first place and in part because the insane groupie scene muddied the waters to an crazy extent. Duff climbed into this shit of his own volition because he is the most image hungry guy in the group. Duff’s “persona” is very important to him and his persona is that of a college educated dude who started a wealth management group to help other musicians and spends his time being a good husband, great father, and punk as funk. In reality of course, he has no college degree, his wealth management company never existed or even got off the ground, he’s been married three times and he’s using his wealth and parenting skills to turn his young daughters into Instagram-y Rockstar/models. His punk as fuck aesthetic is simply that, an aesthetic- wearing leather pants in front of his mansion/private jet/yacht. Duff is pretending the 80's never happened but Duff pretends a lot. He's actually kind of sad. He works his ass off for this persona because he is the forgotten member of the Big Three. It’s really more the Big Two and some other guy.
  2. 30 points
    As long as Izzy doesn't say anything, he can still be the fantasy Izzy that people here make him out to be. What do we know for a fact about Izzy? That he left them before, that he doesn't tour (extensively) and that he doesn't like the circus of a giant GNR world tour. But somehow people are convinced Izzy's not on a huge world tour just for monetary reasons People believe what they want to believe. And Axl saying Izzy's Izzy is twisted in something negative. As for Duff: he's a great guy, he tours, is nice to fans, does charity, releases new music, talks to the press. But no, here, he is the big evil guy they have to shit on 24/7 while Izzy who's gone AWOL for years, is god. Lol. This isn't a knock on Izzy, btw, you don't have to hate Izzy to like Duff/Axl/Slash/whoever. Just like you didn't have to pick either Slash or Axl's side back in the day. You can just like them all.
  3. 25 points
    Why? Don't you think it's personal? It only concerns Steven and his family and friends. No one else. His family told someone he's totally fine. So they obviously don't want to make a big thing about this. Why should GNR make any reference to it? The only thing that matters is Steven will be fine. Anything else is really none of our business at all. This is exactly what's wrong with all that social media shit. People think they're entitled to know everything. The family said he's fine. What more do you want? Even if it wasn't an accident, it's not our business. I don't get how some of you think at all.
  4. 20 points
    The timeline of this is also very confusing, and there are things that don’t add up. By all accounts, the incident took place at Gardner St. studios, where the band rehearsed and practically lived for a while (although it seems that Duff and Izzy had their own apartments, and Axl would crash in various places), in an attached small apartment where they had built a small loft, throwing those infamous parties at the parking lot. There were other bands there – one of them being Johnny and the Jaguars and then called The Wild (Dizzy’s old band) – and many people frequenting the place. Also by all accounts, after the police were informed about the incident and raided the place (according to band members the cops broke down the door of the apartment), the band had to leave it and ended up (right away or after roaming for a few days) living in Vicky Hamilton’s apartment. According to Vicky Hamilton, who also seems to be the source for the books by Stephen Davis (Watch You Bleed) and Mick Wall in regards to the timing, the incident took place in December 1985 and by Christmas the band were at her apartment. Michelle, too, says that it happened during that month, and that two weeks passed before her mother and the cops knew about it; moreover, she says that before the incident, Axl was away in Indiana for weeks, so she wasn’t able to tell him about the alleged pregnancy and then the miscarriage (which, she says, happened five weeks after she knew she was pregnant, and then some more time passed after the miscarriage until Axl finally returned to L.A.). Raz Cue, though, in his book, places it in January 1986, and seems very confident about the timing, as he gives details and a specific time indicator (see below). A look at the known club shows the band played during that time period (late ’85 – early ’86) can help shed some more light, in combination with the other sources: November 22, 1985 – The Troubadour December 20, 1985 – Music Machine January 4, 1986 – The Troubadour January 18, 1986 – The Roxy [January 26, 1986 – Starwood Club (source: a-4-d.com)] [February 1, 1986 – The Troubadour (source: gnrontour.com) or Timbers Ballroom (source: ad & flyer at troccolitm.com] February 28, 1986 – The Troubadour March 21, 1986 - Fenders Ballroom The first thing to notice here (even without the two shows in brackets) is that, in either version of December 1985 or January 1986, the band didn’t hide for a long time; which means that the issue was solved within a short period of time, at least by taking a legal route that allowed Axl and Slash to move freely without being at risk of getting arrested. The December 20 and January 4 shows came with flyers that asked for donations for a “Keep us out of jail fund” (you can see them at gnrontour.com). Another, seemingly earlier, flyer, found in Marc Canter’s book Reckless Road, which advertised all three shows of Dec. 20, Jan. 4 and Jan. 18, didn’t contain the donation bit. This seems to underpin the December 1985 version, furthermore indicating: that the legal trouble had occurred already around mid-December (although the band still played shows - Mick Wall wrote wrongly, among many other inaccuracies, that the Dec. 20 show was cancelled); and, (going by Michelle’s version), that the incident itself happened two weeks prior, i.e. early December - so just a few days after the band had played another show on November 22nd. As I said above, Raz Cue’s book The Days of Guns N’ Raz’s gives a different timing, namely January 1986. According to Raz Cue in the book, the “Dio Boots” girl incident (and the subsequent first police raid that led to Dizzy’s arrest and then to the band’s fleeing) took place about one week after the Roxy show on January 18. In his recent new version of events, as it appears on his website, Raz doesn’t mention anything about getting the date of the “Dio Boots” incident wrong. He only places the incident with Michelle “a couple of weeks” before the – now separate - “Dio Boots” one (so about a week before the Roxy show), and the police raid (and Dizzy’s arrest) for the Michelle incident “the next night, or the one after” the “Dio Boots” incident (so about a week after the Roxy show). So all still in January. It could be just assumed that Raz Cue simply gets the timeline wrong and stop here, but now the big confusion starts. According to Reckless Road, as well as The Days of Guns N’ Raz’s, the Jan. 18 Roxy show created a big buzz, which attracted many A&R people from record labels (it was the show that Tom Zutaut missed because he arrived too late). Slash and Duff don’t give a timing in their autobiographies; Duff, though, says that the incident happened “just as the record label frenzy around us was heating up.” [Steven’s book doesn’t help: he is the only one who doesn’t mention the incident at all, and says that he has no idea why they moved into Vicky Hamilton’s apartment (!); he also seems at times to confuse the Gardner studio with West Arkeen’s and Del’s place.] There is a recording of the Jan. 18th show at the Roxy, where Axl is heard dedicating the last song of the set (Goodnight Tonight) like this: “This is for the last two weeks worth of partying at the studio, and all those sweet girls that we asked to see their tits.” This seems to indicate that the band was still at Gardner studios at that time, giving merit to Raz Cue’s timeline. At the February 28th show, that there is also a recording of, Out Ta Get Me is played for the first time and Axl dedicates it “to the LAPD, and any young girls that like to fuck around.” Slash is heard saying, “[...] if anybody runs into a couple of guys named Jeff and Alan (or Allen), feel free to kick their fucking heads in. These are the guys that kicked in our studio door, so if you see them, be my guest.” So that show was definitely after the incident and after the band had come back from hiding, having also written the song related to it in the meantime. That was also the show Tom Zutaut attended and decided to sign the band. But then what about the “Keep us out of jail fund” flyers for the earlier shows of Dec. 20th and Jan. 4th? Could they have been coincidental, just a clever way to promote the band as “bad boys”? It’s so confusing... ------- Anyway, regardless of which version about the timing is correct and whether the incident took place in December 1985 or January 1986, there seems to be a big problem with the claim that Axl was in Indiana “for weeks” before it happened: As noted above, in the December version (going by what Michelle says about the two weeks that passed between it and the police interference, in combination with the date of the show and the flyer for it), the incident is placed in early December, just a few days after the band had played another show, so Axl was there. In the January version, also (going by Raz Cue’s timeline and Axl’s dedication at the Roxy show) the band had played a show on January 4th, i.e. just about a week before the incident happened (plus they were partying at the rehearsal space for two weeks before the Roxy show), so Axl was there. Moreover: Raz Cue says in his book that Axl went to Indiana before he joined L.A Guns (=last months of 1984 – pre-GnR) and there his parents tried to make him give up being a musician and study to be a sound engineer instead, and that made Axl give it another shot in L.A. and take the offer to join L.A. Guns although he was reluctant before because he didn’t like the music they played. Axl would confirm that his parents had tried to make him go back to Indiana: Axl: Up until we got signed, I lived on the streets for five years. I never lived in one place for more than two months, always crashing at people's houses. My parents would say, 'Come back home and go to college and we'll pay for it' but I would reply, 'No, I have to do this now.' [Hit Parader, April 1987] And in an interview in late December 1987, Axl would say that he had just come back from Indiana, where he hadn’t been for about 2-1/2 years, because the last time he had been there his parents had told him that he would achieve nothing being in a band, so he didn’t want to go back there until he had made it and prove them wrong: Axl: [...] I hadn't been back in two years and the last time I was back there - it was at least two and a half years - I thought, I just told myself, ‘I'm not coming back until I get a record out,’ because too many people kept saying ‘Oh, you'll never get anywhere.’ [Interview with Steve Harris, Dec. 1987] ------ TL;DR: So, the claim that Axl was in Indiana for weeks is disproved by the show dates, and, additionally, it doesn’t seem plausible at all that Axl would want to visit Indiana at that point, when the band had started to get interest from record labels. That was also the time that most of the AFD songs were written, and the band debuted a new one almost at each show (e.g. Nightrain was played for the first time at the Dec. 20 show, My Michelle was debuted at the Jan. 4th show, Out Ta Get Me at the Feb. 28th show), so how Axl couldn't have been there all the time? And, as it has already been pointed out, why would he want a baby at that time?!
  5. 20 points
    Yeah I think they are fairly underrated. Another band that I don't think people often mention enough is The Beatles. Did you know that John Lennon and Paul McCartney were really great songwriters!? That blew my mind, who knew, right?
  6. 20 points
    and that's the thing, right? They were young and thought the stuff they were saying and doing was cool. WE are all young and thought the stuff they were saying and doing was cool. We've all grown up since then; them AND us. So now we can all look back on it and say lesson learned. THAT'S the attitude Duff should have had with his responses, not that "it never happened" or "that's not what we meant" bullshit.
  7. 19 points
  8. 17 points
    Pinball machines, an aviation line, literally everything besides new music.
  9. 17 points
    What the hell does it matter whether there was wrong information at the time or not? In fact that initial report is what made a few peoples comments so disgusting. A report comes out that someone stabs themselves in the stomach and the first thing some people think about is using the incident as an argument as to why he shouldn't be in a band? Different opinion??? It has nothing to do with my "opinion" on if Steven should be in the band or not. To be honest that issue was the farthest thing from my my mind when I read the news. I was much more concerned on the persons well being than his status in a band. There comes a point when somethings are just far more important. To most people anyway. That is where the human decency comes in. If Frank stabbed himself in the stomach I can assure you I wouldn't immediately start posting about bringing Matt, Adler, Fitz or any other drummer into the band. I just wouldn't. So you can take your hypocrite comment and stick it some place it hurts...
  10. 15 points
    Having the same haircut for 30+ years is somewhat of a crime in my eyes.
  11. 15 points
    I didn't read all the comments but the #metoo movement is not actually about women being treated equally. It is about sexual assault and harassment (mostly in the workplace). Again I didn't read the comments you are referring to but I can see why people might call certain elements of the movement bullshit. Like the women who have capitalized on the movement to gain fame and money which definitely happens.. Or women who might have 100% willingly used sex as a tool to try to get a job or that part in a movie who might be now changing the story for their advantage. There is no doubt that happens. Then there are the ridiculous knee jerk reactions to the movement causing radio stations to ban songs like "Baby It's Cold Outside".. That was so stupid.. You also have people like Duff trying to re-write history... Things like that.. I am not against the whole #metoo thing but these movements can definitely be a slippery slope.
  12. 15 points
    From TMZ: -- Adler's rep tells TMZ ... the stabbing was not a suicide attempt, and simply an accident.The rep would not specify what caused the accident, except to describe it as a "very minor, superficial wound." So much so, we're told Adler still plans to perform a July 12 gig in Las Vegas. The show must go on, as they say. As for Steven's past substance abuse -- his rep assured us he's been sober for several years.
  13. 15 points
    There are a few complete, no class, low life losers on this board. To start using this incident as a amo in your argument of whether Steven should not be in the band or not is pretty disgusting. How about some basic human fucking decency?
  14. 14 points
    That is a good point, hell one of the reasons why I love It's So Easy and Appetite as whole, isn't because it is stuff I look to do in my own life - living as a street urchin in a dirty rehearsal space behind Guitar Center, surrounded by drugs and sex and groupies. I love it because I find it fascinating that basically these guys, who were still growing up and finding their way in life and doing so in the most real, raw way possible wrote an album reflecting that lifestyle in a completely honest way. I love that about GNR, they were one of the few bands in that era that instead of writing stuff like "She's my cherry pie", wrote "Your daddy works in porno now that mommy's not around'...", they wrote what was real to them and to everyone around them at the time That isn't something to be ashamed of per say, or pretend like it didn't happen that way. In fact that makes it all the more admirable that Duff could go from that, to being a sober, responsible father, author, and continuing to tour in one of the biggest bands in the world. And that concept of change and growth, is all the more reason why we shouldn't pretend like none of that stuff ever happened back in the day
  15. 14 points
    This is not true. Axl was there when Duff was in hospital, if I'm not mistaken, he bailed Slash out and I do think he reached out to Steven as well at some point. He doesn't make a big deal about it though. It's the others saying he did that stuff. So it would be completely out of character of him to tweet about this. Plus, if we believe Steven's family, he's alright. So it would make a small accident into something huge if GNR posted it on social media. If I'm in hospital, I'd rather have someone call me or text me personally than to post it on social media so everyone can see what a great person I am. Average fans like us can only reach out to him on social media, but I'm sure those guys have other ways to reach Steven personally.
  16. 13 points
    Dude, this sounds like a good product that would make the fans happy by giving them what they want and not being over priced, are you sure you are asking this from the right band?
  17. 13 points
    They were all degenerate shitbags. All 5 of them. I'm very dissapointed in Duff trying to revise history instead of owning up to their misgivings. Its clear he is embarrassed by his dark past, but that doesn't make it ok trying to cover it up with bullshit. Its better to own up to it and show how you changed and learned from it
  18. 13 points
    It's interesting that Raz Cue says this now about the 1985 incident. I've read his book (which was released not long ago), and he gives a different version of that there: About a week after the Roxy gig, at a more intimate gathering, some psycho chick who had stalked Axl for more than a year showed up. She usually sported knee-high suede moccasins, the type chicks with hairy pits love, so was often referred to as “That crazy bitch wearing the Dio boots.” Soon after Dio Boots wandered down the alley in search of Axl – who hadn’t been there all day – she was told to get lost. Eventually, someone led her by an elbow out to the street. But twenty minutes later, she returned with cops, claiming Axl had raped her. The cops made everyone come out of the studio, where Dio Boots pointed at Dizzy Reed from The Wild and said, “That’s Axl. He raped me.” As Dizzy got hauled off, people yelled at the cops, “That’s not Axl!” and, “That chick’s crazy!” [...] After three months at Gardner Studio, the place was getting hotter than a super model singing torch songs in a kiln. With rent due, a growing number of the humped-dumped begging for more, plus a few too many psycho stalkers, the time felt right to get the fuck out of studio B. The guys scattered about Hollywood, or, as a last resort, hid away at Vicky’s apartment. [Raz Cue, The Days of Guns N' Raz's, 2017]
  19. 13 points
    It’s wild to me that such a major brand name is managed by people like this. Imagine if McDonalds was managed by TB? “You want new menu options? Ronald doesn’t owe you anything!! Isn’t the new packaging of our Big Mac beautiful?? New chicken sandwich being worked on but not sure if soon is the word.”
  20. 12 points
    Axl: “See ya at the Troubadour on 4/1/16...”
  21. 12 points
    "Don't waste your time always searching for those wasted years. Face up, make your stand. And realize you're living in the golden years."
  22. 12 points
    I can't wait for the brand new singles that will inevitably come with it, "Ain't Goin' Down" and "Welcome To The Jungle (1994)".
  23. 12 points
    That dude's smile is made of gold. It literally makes me feel better to see Steven smile.
  24. 12 points
    so is he gonna leak the full version of Jackie Chan or not ?
  25. 12 points
    The Mysterious Gear Used on Guns N' Roses' Appetite For Destruction UG unravels the mystery and dispels the myths surrounding the gear used by Slash to record Appetite For Destruction. 4h ago by JustinBeckner [w] 1,190 · 4,375 Tone chasers have long searched for the secret to Slash’s iconic tone on the Appetite For Destruction (AFD) record. AFD had a tone that stood out, not only because of Slash’s unquestionable abilities as a guitarist, but because the gear that was being used was somewhat unique as well. A lot of people have done a lot of research on the subject and there is a lot of information out there – some correct, some incorrect. In the following article we will discuss the general consensus on what went into creating the tone on the record and the story of the mysterious amplifier Slash used to lay down the tracks. Mythology is an essential part of culture. When we think of the AFD tone, we think – a Gibson Les Paul plugged into a Marshall Amplifier. But the reality is that Slash wasn’t playing a Gibson Les Paul on that record and the Marshall wasn’t a stock Marshall. He was playing a replica of a Les Paul made by Kris Derrig, a luthier out of California. So when Gibson released the “Slash Appetite Les Paul” it was actually a replica of a replica of a Les Paul (I suppose you could turn them in…). The Guitars Prior to the recording of AFD, Slash was broke. He was playing B.C. Rich Warlocks and Mockingbirds and had even borrowed a black Stratocaster from someone for a show or two. Some accounts of the guitars used on the album are conflicting but as Slash stated in an interview in 2010 with Noisecreep “I was really broke and I hocked all my decent guitars before we went into the studio to make Appetite for Destruction, all I had left were a B.C. Rich Warlock and two Jackson guitars, a Firebird, and a prototype archtop Strat-style guitar. I brought them all into the recording studio for the Appetite session and they all sounded horrible. I was like, ‘Fuck, what do I do? I have to do the overdubs and I have no instrument.” Slash goes on to say that his manager brought him the Les Paul the next morning. In his memoir (great book) Slash states, “It was made by the late Jim Foot[e], who owned MusicWorks in Redondo Beach.” However, Foote shared a shop space with another luthier named Kris Derrig – Foote did own the shop but Kris built most of the guitars. Casting further doubt on the authenticity of Slash’s comment in the book is the fact that Jim Foote was still alive when the book was written and Kris Derrig was not. So, it would seem, by all credible accounts, that Slash’s Les Paul that he recorded AFD with was, in fact, a replica built by Kris Derrig. This story has since been confirmed by Foote. Kris’ replica of a ’59 Sunburst featured a jaw-dropping flame top that was something that was rarely seen, even in the Gibsons of that day. Kris’ guitars were not exact replicas, Slash’s was fitted with Seymour Duncan Alnico II Zebra pickups and had a thinner neck than Gibsons. Kris’ son, Dale, estimates that his dad made “about 20, maybe more” of these Les Paul replicas. Slash later tracked one down and now owns two of them. Many of the replicas were most likely passed off as Gibsons (they did feature the “Gibson” logo on the headstock) and lost to the world. Lenny Kravitz and Charlie Daniels are both said to own one. Frankly, Kris made Les Pauls better than Gibson did at that time. We all know that Gibson has a major distaste for forgeries and replicas, the irony here is that one of their most iconic signature series guitars is actually a replica of a replica. Tragically, Kris passed away due to throat cancer in 1987, a few months prior to the release of AFD. The Amp(s) On March 26th, 1986, Guns & Roses signed to Geffen Records. The budget they were given to record their debut album (including advances) was $370,000. According to Slash’s book, rather than shopping for gear, he spend his advance on heroin. As a result, Slash ended up renting gear for the recording of AFD – this was a pretty customary practice in those days. Some believed that Slash used a Marshall Silver Jubilee for recording AFD, but since the Silver Jubilee wasn’t available until 1987, this turned out to be untrue, although Slash did use a Silver Jubilee on subsequent tours. So in the spring of 1986, Slash went into S.I.R. (Studio Instrument Rentals) to test out amplifiers to use on the album. As I already mentioned, Slash was broke and didn’t have an amp he felt was good enough to record with. He came across an amp that he fell in love with – A Marshall Model 1959T Super Lead Tremolo – pre-master volume, and post-Plexi (it had a metal faceplate). The amp had stenciled lettering that read: “Stock #39”. When the band went in to record the album (between August and December of 1986) Slash specifically requested Stock #39 from S.I.R. But there was a problem, someone else had also fallen in love with that exact amplifier, George Lynch had used the amp in the studio for the recording of Under Lock and Key in 1985. He tried everything to get them to sell it to him, the company would not part with it so he rented the amp for $2000 to use it on Dokken’s 1986 tour – that tour ended September 13th in Irvine, California. So, based on this timeline, it would appear that amp was not available for Slash to use during the recording session, but the company still had an obligation to deliver a comparable amp. Stock #39 was not a stock Super Lead Tremolo - it had been modified by a tech who worked for the company named Tim Caswell. Tim modded the amp by taking the amp’s unused tremolo circuit which had an additional pre-amp tube and turning it into an extra preamp stage. The amp sported EL34 power tubes (they were typically shipped to the US with 6550s in those days). He also added a master volume. In short, Tim was a great tech with an affinity for gain stacking. Unfortunately, Tim left the company in 1985. The guy who took his place was a guy named Frank Levi. After Tim left, his modded “Stock #39” had become a favorite among those looking to rent gear. So, Frank was tasked with making more amps like the “Stock #39”. Frank’s first test subject was an amp dubbed “Stock #36” which was a Model 1959 (Super Lead) but was not a Tremolo, therefore, it didn’t have the existing tube and circuit to convert, so a hole was drilled and the extra gain stage (tube & circuit) was added right next to the existing three preamp tubes. The sound still wasn’t quite correct so Frank kept tinkering and ended up swapping out some capacitors from “donor amps” some of which were allegedly, old Fenders. There were only a couple ways to notice the difference between #39 and #36 (aside from the stenciled numbers painted on the tolex). In #39, you could switch the fourth pre-amp tube on and off via a toggle switch mounted in place of one of the input jacks (#36 was just “on” all the time). #36 also had a master volume knob mounted in a different spot. So, according to a supervisor at S.I.R. at the time, Glenn Buckley, S.I.R. sent Slash #36, although they never told him that, leading to many false tales of the legendary Stock #39 being used on AFD. Slash never seemed to notice and was very happy with #36. So much so, that he began to scheme on how to keep the amp after the sessions. He offered to buy it and the company refused. So he ducked their calls for a while and finally told them it had been stolen. Glenn suspected that Slash still had the amp and had his people looking everywhere for it. Eventually one of Glenn’s employees called him up and said they had seen the amp at Stage 6 (a rehearsal space owned by S.I.R.) where the band was rehearsing for their 1987 tour with The Cult. Glenn personally went down to Stage 6, with some extra muscle of course, to get his amp back. In what turned out to be a rather anti-climactic end, the band wasn’t there when he arrived and he simply grabbed the amp and walked out with it. According to Glenn, Slash never said anything to him about the amp after that. But Slash has publicly decried his “idiot” tech at the time for bringing it to the rehearsal space, Telling Guitar Magazine in 1992, I had [a perfect amp] when I did Appetite, which was great. I stole it from S.I.R., and when we were rehearsing at S.I.R. after the record came out, my idiot roadie at the time brought that amp down by mistake, and they took it back. When we went back into the studio a couple years later, I had to find the ultimate amp again… So, thanks to some good investigative journalism from J.R. Rymas, who hunted down Glenn to tell the story, it would seem that the amp used on the bulk of the tracks on AFD was a Marshall Model 1959 modded by Frank Levi, not the Stock #39. That’s not a mark against Caswell in any way - #36 was a recreation of Caswell’s #39 and the “AFD Mod” is often referred to as a #39 Mod. That amp was later replicated by Marshall for what became sold as the Marshall AFD100 – the process of replicating that amp took over 8 months and also featured its own Slash inspired design. Only 2,300 of those were ever made – why 2,300? When it came out, it had been 23 years since the release of AFD (That’s not including the 100 Special Edition Amps that were signed by Slash). As for Tim Caswell, he started his own amp company in 2008. George Lynch reportedly hunted Tim down after the 1986 tour and had Tim modify every Marshall amp he owned and now has at least 6 Marshalls with the “#39 Mod”. Slash also has a 1959 Super Lead that he later had Tim Caswell mod for him – he used that amp for the second Velvet Revolver record and all of his solo records. https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/articles/features/the_mysterious_gear_used_on_guns_n_roses_appetite_for_destruction-92565
  26. 12 points
    I look at it a little bit differently. I think Izzy would mostly do it for the money. He is not interested in the big touring, all the logistics, the drama, etc. He is also not craving a closure since he has played with them all before. I think he mostly wants the money, and maybe giving back to the fans. We know money has been important to him before. It was likely part of his decision to quit back in '91. He also had demands for playing with the band later. So with him perhaps having too high expectations on his revenues from the reunion touring, and the rest of the guys maybe considering him a liability in the sense of whether he would be there for the whole thing or suddenly take off, I think it all ran out in the sand. And I don't think, really, that we can blame any of the parties more than the other. We simply don't know he details. I believe Duff when he said he wanted Izzy to be there. I am sure they all did. But in the end they couldn't reach that middle ground and that happens. Nothing to get angry about.
  27. 11 points
    Just wanted to share some Adler's Appetite goodness, this guy sings his face off and isn't far from sounding something like Axl.
  28. 11 points
    Fresh off a run with the The Hollywood Vampires, Alice won't be home long. We discuss the Vampires, Johnny Depp, tour life, Nita Strauss, Lzzy Hale, "The Garden" with Guns N' Roses and more!! iHeartRadio --> https://ihr.fm/2Loxbwv Spreaker --> https://bit.ly/2Yh8SEg Stitcher --> https://bit.ly/2HnXGhC SoundCloud --> https://bit.ly/2NcMJWB Google Play --> https://bit.ly/2XbQU9O
  29. 11 points
    And when you're talkin' about a vasectomy- Yeah I'll be writin' down your obituary- HISTORY What you pissed off cuz your dad gets more pussy than you? And to all those opposed... Hmm...well
  30. 11 points
    This is a difficult story to figure out. Let's start with Axl himself and what he said in an interview from as early as June 1986 and involved a "hippie chick", or as Cue refers to her, "Dio Booths" or "psycho girl": Axl: "Being bad is a rush. One time this hippie chick wandered into our studio and she was fucking with our equipment, trying to break stuff. We wouldn’t call the cops – they’d turn the situation around and hassle us for picking on this poor girl. So eventually she wound up running down Sunset naked, all dingy, doesn’t even know her name. The firemen and the cops all came down on us, and I’m sitting in there hiding behind an amplifier. They got six or seven people lined up in there, and she identifies someone else as me. (He went to court and got off, by the way.) While the cops are there harassing everybody, asking questions, I’m with this girl behind the amp, going at it, and that was a rush! I got away with it! It was really exciting!" [L.A. Weekly, June 1986]. Vicky Hamilton seems to confirm this story: Hamilton: "There was a girl over there [at the Gardner place] one night, and she wouldn't leave Axl alone and he got pissed, so he ripped off her clothes, threw her out and locked the door. So she went to the cops and said he raped her" [Musician, December 1988]. Hamilton was not there herself, and had got the story from Slash. According to Cue, the girl had "stalked Axl for a year". Then we have what might be a second incident, also involving Slash. Again we have the story directly from the horse's mouth: Slash: "What happened is Axl and me were with these two girls, and they got in a sexual situation and they decided to file rape charges. Me and Axl had to borrow suits one day to go down to the police station and turn ourselves in over this crap – and when it came down to the wire, they dropped the charges because it was all bogus. We didn’t fucking do anything to them" [Spin, May 1988]. Slash: "Well, there were these girls who wanted to get laid, that were very severely frustrated because they weren't getting any. We gave one of them to a bunch of friends of ours, the other I took up to the bungalow to meet Axl one night, but I said, 'I'm drunk, I'll let Axl fuck you and I'll watch; then her boyfriend walked in, and they claimed it was rape. Me and Axl had to hide out from the cops for weeks and shit, and then we had to go to all these lawyers and go 'what the fuck do we do?' But it was a big mistake, because in reality it wasn't true, so when it came down to the wire and were down at the police station' getting questioned and I was getting my arms fucking checked for tracks and getting completely humiliated by the cops, when it came down to the end of it, when they had to testify and make something up, they didn't have the balls for it [Metal Hammer, February 1990]. So on the face of it, we have two different incidents both leading to rape charges. That both Slash and Axl was charged is confirmed by others, including Izzy. Or could it be just one story? Maybe there was a second girl in the first story, not mentioned by Axl because it didn't happen at the same time at Gardner's? So what could have happened was that there were two girls hanging around the band and Gardner studio at the time. One, who annoyed them and especially Axl, was "[given] […] to some friends of ours" (perhaps at the Gardner studio), then kicked out without her clothes by Axl. She went directly to the police, they came, but Axl was hiding (confirmed by both Axl and Cue that they didn't get him). Her friend, the other girl, was fucked by Axl on a different night while Slash was watching, her boyfriend caught them in the act leading to, according to Slash, a bogus rape charge. It is not clear why Slash would get a rape charge from this, unless the "given to some friends of ours" was as sinister as it sounds and was Slash's act or he was involved. Where does "Little Michelle" fit into this? She might not. Hers could have been a different, or entirely made up, event. But, there are similarities between her stories and the quotes above. She claims to have been given over to random people at the studio (Axl allegedly urged others to violate her while he was holding her down), which could be what Slash referred to with his "gave one of them to a bunch of friends of ours". She claims to have been kicked out of the studio naked, like the "psycho chick"/"Dio boots"/"hippie girl" from Axl's story. Where does that lead us? Not very far. It is word against word. On the face of it, "Little Michelle" could have been the girl that was kicked out naked, and she may or may not have been molested before that happened while Axl was holding her down. On the other hand, nothing more wicked may have happened than some pestering wannabe getting kicked out naked and a case of a spurned boyfriend pressing charges. And this could be another case of someone fabricating a story, or exaggerating an event, for personal gain. What we need is someone else stepping up to say what happened. Dizzy could shed light on the story mentioned by Axl and hopefully confirm or deny it was "Little Michelle" (because Dizzy should have known her). Slash could go in more detail about the rape charge filed against him. What about other witnesses to either story? Likely none will see a reason to talk about this and it will remain another of those "he said, she said" stories in the history of GN'R. To "Little Michelle": On the face of it coming to a band fan page to present a story where you claim one band members did awful things to you is venturing into a minefield. Especially when that band is GN'R and you are talking about Axl. People here are biased, in both directions. Some will embrace any opportunity to confirm their negative opinions of Axl. Some will vehemently defend him against everything. What I am saying is that you won't find a more passionate audience and it might get heated, you might get hurt. That being said, people here are knowledgeable and come with various backgrounds and experiences, allowing them to helpfully criticize or support your accusations. And the moderator team here is as good as it gets.
  31. 11 points
  32. 11 points
    Is anyone else completely and totally over the self manufactured drama that comes with this situation? I sure am. I've never seen a band with less of an actual fan base be more involved in creating more drama and bullshit for the few actual fans they have left than this band. I'm sorry, but this whole copyright strike situation falls under that column. This is a situation created by GNR and their "management", whether anyone wants to believe that or not. We know Del thinks it's funny. Maybe the rest fo GNR "management" thinks it's funny too. I guess maybe I would if I'd been free loading off of someone with the real talent my whole life. I don't know for sure because it hasn't happened to me, but maybe I would so I guess I can't judge.
  33. 11 points
    Lol at people calling the "me too" movement bullshit... How dare woman want to be treated equal?! Some of you suck
  34. 11 points
    My impression is that Raz Cue doesn't really give a shit about the abused girl (to throw someone on the street naked -which seems to be the true part of the story-is abuse) who was "scarred for life," the same girl who he calls a "psycho chick" and a "bitch" in his book. He only cares about supporting Trump.
  35. 11 points
    He'll be alright. He's been stabbed before. In the back.
  36. 10 points
    He might be worth as much as Duff, but definitely not Slash. I'm not saying that's right, I'm just saying that's how it is. Duff came back for a run of shows prior to Slash and it had absolutely no effect on anything. The band wasn't able to charge any more for tickets then before that. The combination of Slash & Axl is all that's needed for them to play stadiums and charge what they do. That's been proven.
  37. 10 points
    Fair enough, this seems to be a good place to put the thread on hold. If there are developments in the future, we'll reopen the thread.
  38. 10 points
  39. 10 points
    This tour should have ended in 2017 with the NA shows. It's getting a little ridiculous now
  40. 10 points
    I was coming to post something extremely similar. I would wager good money that one of the things that drew most GN'R fans to them in the first place was their "No BS" attitude. Good, bad or indifferent; GN'R was GN'R. So I can totally understand how so many fans are beyond irritated with Duff ridiculous attempt to double talk and BS people now regarding old GN'R lyrics and images. As you said, he would be much better off just telling the truth. "Hey, we were young and dumb. We said and did young and dumb things. It is what it is".
  41. 10 points
    Duff "The King of Beers" McKagan - the ultimate villain for the GNR fanbase. He dethroned Axl. People really need to hate someone.
  42. 10 points
  43. 9 points
    Yeah, but I'm talking about this particular case. Why attack Duff when he isn't the perpetrator and wasn't even there? Even if he is a hypocrite (which I'm not saying he is), is that worse than being the perpetrator? Especially from Michelle's POV? So is it worse to say now that it's not okay to abuse women than to actually have done it? As far as I know, Duff has never been accused of rape or abuse, and the last 2 decades or so he has led a healthy life, being a good person, trying to stay on the right path, raising a family. But all of a sudden he has to be attacked, not the heroin dealer, not the alleged rapist, just because they shut up? It makes absolutely zero sense to me. Same goes for the others who joined in the rape. Wouldn't you try to find out who they were after it happened? Or would you still live around that scene suspicious that anyone around there might be one of the people abusing you? Why don't they get any backlash? They were just as guilty as Axl was, if the story is true. But no, let's all attack the guy who wasn't there at all, but makes a song about how it is not okay to abuse women more than 30 years later, because he is clearly the enemy. It makes zero sense.
  44. 9 points
    I interviewed Duff back in early 2009 when Loaded's Sick was released (I write on a bunch of music magazines here in Italy). He was glad to answer a bunch of GNR related questions I had and one of them was about the Hell Tour. I asked him if they played any other shows on their way back to L.A., because some sources reported them and some didn't, and he confirmed that no other shows were played beside the one in Seattle.
  45. 9 points
    It's unfortunate, but our forum always has to be extra cautious with things like this. There's another forum (GNR Truth) that seems to have an unhealthy obsession with us. That's the forum imsorry was referring to. It's just odd that Raz used to have his own section over there and now "Truth" gets mentioned several times. Sounds way out there and as of now, I'm not accusing anyone of anything. It's merely in the back of my mind is all. It really sucks for us that we have to live with our guard up, but it is what it is :/
  46. 9 points
    From the whole grunge scene i always thought AIC was the most underrated.
  47. 9 points
    I suppose we can kiss goodbye to any documentary or accurate recounting of the pre-AFD Hell House days - none of these guys have the stones for it. Needless to say, any Illusion era documentary they release officially will be an airbrushed pg-13 version where they photoshop out the drugs and groupies
  48. 9 points
  49. 9 points
    just want to remind you that you, the one who buys tickets for these shows, are responsible for the lack of matt/gilby/steven/izzy, the lack of new music and the most horrible fan service in rock n roll history. its a problem since 1996. instead of supporting Axl Rose, we all should have boycotted him. thats the bitter truth about guns n roses.
  50. 9 points
    Has everyone calmed down yet?
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