SoulMonster

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SoulMonster last won the day on December 1 2015

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  1. I remember seeing this many years ago. It really upset me for 2-3 days.
  2. Duruing band introduction on August 16, Axl referenced the Dizzy story about the tuned-down piano when they recoded Civil War, saying "And on the keyboards, the man who never knew you could tune a piano down half a step, Mr. Dizzy Fucking Reed!...As he put it, 'The bane of his existence'"
  3. But Nazis refer to any member of the German Nazi Party, and they were NOT the same as the SS. I think the average Nazi back in the day was as intellectual as the average neo-Nazi today, or actually even less. But yeah, I too wouldn't refer to today's variey as "Nazi" only neo-Nazi which has the connotation of it being a descendant of something and thus not exactly the same.
  4. Can someone transcribe what Axl said about Coma?
  5. But do you work as a historian professionally or are you more of an hobby historian? Anyway, there seems to be consensus that these guys are the ideological descendants of the Nazis, they use Nazi symbolism, they admire Hitler, they defend the Holocaust, and they refer to themselves as Nazis, so I will continue to call them neo-Nazis like everyone else. You might have a point that their views differ in such ways that they shouldn't really be called Nazis, but I doubt it and will continue to follow the consensus.
  6. You are? Where do you work?
  7. Then setlist.fm is wrong again. Anyone has the complete setlist for this show? EDIT: I see setlist.fm has been updated now.
  8. Can I have a third opinion?
  9. No Attitude or New Rose at this show?
  10. That's okay, you are not a historian. They are considered to be a modern version of nazists by most historians and I will follow that.
  11. No, I seriously interpreted your post in the way that you meant that calling the neo-nazis for neo-nazis is disrespecting victims of Nazi Germany. Here it is again: "..but how absolutely disrespectful to Jewish people to act like the event over the weekend somehow compared to a real Nazi regime or an event from that time..... and on top of that, calling the president a Nazi.....sorry to inform these pathetic social justice warriors, the event over the weekend and the president of the U.S. do not compare in the least to what the Jews and other ethnic folks went through against the real Nazis and simply calling someone you don't like or agree with a Nazi, is disrespecting the people and the families that had to live (or died) during the real Nazi regime. Shame on you." Okay, I see now that you probably only meant that refering to Trump as a nazi is disrespectful, even if you are talking about "the events over the weekend" suggesting you are also talking about the alt-right guys. Oh well. I agree that we have no reason to call Trump a nazi, yet. So far we only know he is a selfish moron with fascistic leanings.
  12. They adore Hitler, they defend the Final Solution, they believe Jews are our greatest problem, they are against the weak, the adhere to racial theory of the 1930s, etc etc. The similaries are so many that both them and others find it naturally to refer to them as neo-nazis. Not only that. To become a nazi in the 1930s was probably easier than to become one today. Back then, the Nazi party of Germany, although clearly racist and anti-semittic, also had a broader political platform with solutions for more "everyday problems". So the party would recruit a broader spectrum of the demographoics. Today, though, whoever refer to themselves as "neo-nazi" would probably be focussed on the less savoury aspects of nazism, like its racial theory, its hatred of Jews, its ultranationalism, etc. So I find the neo-nazis today even more loathsome than the old nazis. Luckily, societies today (probably) won't allow nazism to become as big of a problem like it did in the 30s -- it is different times -- but refusing to oppose them, like Trump has now done repeatedly, or treat them as mere fascistic dillettants who are not worthy of the name of nazis, is only helping them.
  13. You also mentioned that victims of Nazi brutality in the 30s and 40s are "disrespected" if we refer to these guys as neo-nazis (which they call themselves, too). I strongly disagree. I think survivors of Nazi Germany would be shocked if we excused and shied away from calling these people -- who adore Hitler, think the Holocaust was the right move, want to exterminate handicapped people, etc -- what they are, which are nazis. By not taking them serious enough to accept that they are probably worse than the nazis back in the day, survivors of the period where Nazis in Germany slowly gained control and disrupted that society, would be right to be worried and sad. Have we learnt nothing? The only way we can properly respect the loss and tragedy the survivors went through, including the 6 million Jews who were brutally killed, is to properly address similar challenges today -- like disturbing growth of neo-nazism.
  14. But that goes for nazis back in the day, too. They weren't all well-versed in the ideology, far from it. I think this goes for many movements, especially those that are somewhat ideological complex.
  15. Who are you talking about? Just like not every nazi back in the 1930s and 1940s understood the finer point of their ideology or even some of it, the same goes for today's neo-nazis. But regardless of whether every neo-nazi is conscious about their ideology, they still follow a movement that is homologues to classical nazism in its main points.