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Pele

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About Pele

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  1. Dijon and Dexter's Twitter Accounts

    These are real, and 'James Mojo' did know about them - hence some of his 'insider' info. Remember his 'hell froze over' comment?
  2. It's really upto the Promoter/Agents. The promoters 'buys' the dates from the Agent and routes the tour. Live Nation (nor any other) wouldn't buy a stadium winter tour for GNR.
  3. Do any members here know how concert promoters get paid?

    This isn't correct with acts at this scale. Below is an example. A band has an Agent. The Agent will inform promoters that their act will play 10 dates and invite Promoters to bid for the right to promote these 10 dates. A promoter wins the bid at $10m ($1m per show). The band get $10m (Agent fees included) The promoter needs to now route the tour. It is up to them to book venues, set ticket price and launch a marketing campaign. A large venue will charge (very roughly) $3.50-$4 per capacity, so a 10k seated Arena will likely cost in the region of $35-40k. For that, the venue provide stage, front of house staff and technicians. Promoter brings production, set, screens and provides artist security. Venue handle all food and drink transactions and retain income. A rock gig averages $4 spend per head. Venue usually supply staff and sell merchandise, and retain 25% of revenue. Some venues have an in-house ticketing platform. Booking fees average around 11%, so there is a potential income of an additional $10-12 per ticket sold (venues can make more in booking fees than in hire fee). Usually the promoter will have existing relationships with Agents such as Ticketmaster, who will kick back a portion of those booking fees straight back to the promoter.
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