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LightningBolt

Dawn vs. Don pronunciation

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I was having a discussion with some people earlier today, and somehow the discussion went to pronunciations of various things. I asked if they pronounced the word "on" similar to the vowel sound in "dawn" or the vowel sound in "don" and I got the strangest reactions. "The hell is the difference?" This just blew my mind because where I'm from (Philadelphia area) these vowel sounds are completely different, but they couldn't even comprehend that there's a difference between them. So my googling eventually led me to some wiki page on the cot-caught merger in pronunciation and I thought it was really interesting because I didn't even realize it existed. Apparently a lot of places, at least in North America idk about the rest of the English speaking world, have merged the use of the two different vowel sounds.

Do you pronounce the words differently? If so, did you realize that the merger in vowel sounds existed, and if not, did you realize people actually pronounced them differently? How about people from Europe or other English-speaking places? Any other pronunciation-related thoughts?

idk why but I'm really interested this right now. I thought I was aware of most of the big pronunciation differences in North America but this is a pretty big one and I was in the very very small minority.

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If you pronounce those words the same, you are a certifiable retard.

Dawn = the way it's spelled

Don = Doon

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Dawn = "Dorn"

Don - "da-on"

I can't see dawn & don being homophones.

So the one with the a has an o sound and the one with an o has an a sound?

I pronounce them the same personally.

certifiable retard.

Don = Doon

lol

Edited by bacardimayne
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Guest Len B'stard

Its quite simple and they're pronounced exactly how they are spelt D-AWN...Don, its the difference between an Aww and On, d-aw-n, as opposed to a plain O sound, I'm suprised the difference needs explaining i mean they are pronounced exactly as they are spelt.

The trick is that you elongated the aw in dawn whereas Don is sharp and truncated sounding, let your aw's out folks.

Edited by sugaraylen
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Its quite simple and they're pronounced exactly how they are spelt D-AWN...Don, its the difference between an Aww and On, d-aw-n, as opposed to a plain O sound, I'm suprised the difference needs explaining i mean they are pronounced exactly as they are spelt.

The trick is that you elongated the aw in dawn whereas Don is sharp and truncated sounding, let your aw's out folks.

You know things are getting bad when Len is the one explaining basic pronounciation :lol:

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Guest Len B'stard

Surely being au fait with a variety of slang means that the person is well versed in a broader range of pronunciation...uh, and ting :lol:

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Dawn = "Dorn"

Don - "da-on"

I can't see dawn & don being homophones.

So the one with the a has an o sound and the one with an o has an a sound?

I pronounce them the same personally.

certifiable retard.

Don = Doon

lol
So when you got a mate called Donald you don't pronounce it as "Doo-nuld"?

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Dawn rhymes with Yawn

Don rhymes with On

Yawn does not rhyme with On

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Who the heck uses the word 'dawn' anyway, unless you have a friend called Dawn, or are writing GCSE poetry?

It rhymes with lawn.

Don rhymes with gone.

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If you pronounce those words the same, you are a certifiable retard.

Dawn = the way it's spelled

Don = Doon

Wut?

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Who the heck uses the word 'dawn' anyway, unless you have a friend called Dawn, or are writing GCSE poetry?

It rhymes with lawn.

Don rhymes with gone.

It's just an example. :P

So I don't know where everyone who has posted in here is from, but it definitely seems like those who aren't from North America pronounce them differently.

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Dawn rhymes with Yawn

Don rhymes with On

Yawn does not rhyme with On

Not necessarily. Where I'm from, dawn, yawn and on rhyme. Don is the odd one out. On is pronounced like the first syllable of awning.

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Dawn rhymes with Yawn

Don rhymes with On

Yawn does not rhyme with On

Not necessarily. Where I'm from, dawn, yawn and on rhyme. Don is the odd one out. On is pronounced like the first syllable of awning.

I think that's a mid-Atlantic and southern thing. It's the same way here (hence why I asked that question in the first place).

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Dawn = "Dorn"

Don - "da-on"

I can't see dawn & don being homophones.

So the one with the a has an o sound and the one with an o has an a sound?

I pronounce them the same personally.

certifiable retard.

Don = Doon

lol
So when you got a mate called Donald you don't pronounce it as "Doo-nuld"?

I'd love to hear you pronounce Ronald McDonald :lol:

Dawn rhymes with Yawn

Don rhymes with On

Yawn does not rhyme with On

Not necessarily. Where I'm from, dawn, yawn and on rhyme. Don is the odd one out. On is pronounced like the first syllable of awning.

That's so weird.

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Well, I studied some english phonetics and phonology at uni and there are different consonants and vowel sounds; that means, short vowels or long vowels ...etc. They make the difference "accoustically" to distinguish one word or sound from another. For exemple (typical exemple lol), we, non native speakers tend to pronounce certain words the same way but they are actually pronounced diffrently:

Sheep ( long i)

Ship (short i)

So I guess that the same happens with these two words:

Dawn ( long o)

Don (short o)

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Dawn = "Dorn"

Don - "da-on"

I can't see dawn & don being homophones.

So the one with the a has an o sound and the one with an o has an a sound?

I pronounce them the same personally.

certifiable retard.

Don = Doon

lol
So when you got a mate called Donald you don't pronounce it as "Doo-nuld"?

tumblr_lhiapxHxsN1qaci5yo1_500.jpg

You'd call him Doo-nuld only if you are about to ask him where his troosers are.

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I remember there was a joke about this in Mad Men, where Don (Draper, big, tall white guy) and his secretary Dawn (small, black woman) were concerned about getting confused.

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In West Virginia it's pronounced the same. Dawn,Don and On all pronounced with an awwww as in awning. Which sounds like the word on.

How do you pronounce the word or letter I?In the southern most parts of WV,a lot of people pronounce it the same as eye. In other words,it is a short i sound not a long I. Lol

One time in a restaurant in a northern part if WV. I had asked for a straw/drinking straw. The waitress looked at me like I had three heads lol. And asked where I was from. I told her WV. She said she had never heard straw pronounced that way. To others it sounds like I am putting an L on the end of straw. Lol

I so have the southern drawl lol

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You just pronounce the W and the N together, and say Don like it's supposed to be said. Don.

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