Jump to content
downzy

US Politics/Elections Thread

Recommended Posts

“More generally, I am reviewing the conduct of the investigation and trying to get my arms around the aspects of the counterintelligence investigation that was conducted in the summer of 2016,” Barr testified.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

House Oversight hearing, discussing climate change. Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY) calls Kerry a pseudo-scientist for having a bachelors degree in political science :facepalm:

At no point did Massie make a good point or appear sincere but he seems to have thought that he was taking the win when asking questions like “Did geology stop when we got on the planet?” 

At one point there is a round of applause for Kerry that Massie seemed to have thought was for him :lol: 

Kerry claps back pretty good, he could've used more of that during his Presidential run!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Based on policy, approach, and experience, but not electability, Warren is my favorite candidate. I wish Warren hadn't done the whole DNA Test thing. I think that killed her electability in an election vs Trump and voters sort of know it. Plus, her demographic isn't very popular - Americans really don't like the whole older-female-professor type. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Jakey Styley said:

Based on policy, approach, and experience, but not electability, Warren is my favorite candidate. I wish Warren hadn't done the whole DNA Test thing. I think that killed her electability in an election vs Trump and voters sort of know it. Plus, her demographic isn't very popular - Americans really don't like the whole older-female-professor type. 

If Americans were electing a Prime Minister that had the same level of authority over domestic policy, I would agree that Warren would likely be the best candidate for the job.  The problem is that President has to work with Congress to get stuff passed.  I'm not sure if Warren is that person, largely not fault of her own.  As Republicans were adverse to working with Obama, I can't see Republicans working with a woman President either.  Sad, but unfortunately for a Democratic president to get anything done he'll likely have to be a white male.  And even then it's unlikely he'll get much cooperation, but i definitely feel he'd have an easier time and Warren or Harris.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/10/2019 at 2:45 PM, soon said:

House Oversight hearing, discussing climate change. Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY) calls Kerry a pseudo-scientist for having a bachelors degree in political science :facepalm:

At no point did Massie make a good point or appear sincere but he seems to have thought that he was taking the win when asking questions like “Did geology stop when we got on the planet?” 

At one point there is a round of applause for Kerry that Massie seemed to have thought was for him :lol: 

Kerry claps back pretty good, he could've used more of that during his Presidential run!

"Science, according to a Trump appointee at the Department of the Interior, is "a Democrat thing." Those words were reportedly used to justify the abrupt 2017 cancellation of a study into the health effects of mountaintop removal for coal-mining."

Science is "a Democrat thing": Mantra of the Trump administration revealed

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, -W.A.R- said:

"Science, according to a Trump appointee at the Department of the Interior, is "a Democrat thing." Those words were reportedly used to justify the abrupt 2017 cancellation of a study into the health effects of mountaintop removal for coal-mining."

Science is "a Democrat thing": Mantra of the Trump administration revealed

Its good to get that in writing at least, but scary af. And in this example that stance might even physically harm his own base :facepalm:

Our previous neocon regime in Canada 'muzzled' climate scientists and other scientists. In some cases ideologues wrote statements for the media and tried to attribute them to silenced climate scientists! Set a tone where many scientists were intimidated to even seek permission to speak to the public or media.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/health/second-opinion-scientists-muzzled-1.4588913

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

vs 

“Let’s drop water on it from the sky! Hhhhhhnnnnngggggghhhhhhhh!!!!”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, -W.A.R- said:

Yep, hes nervous.

 

Whether you hate his politics or not, you have to respect Sanders for being part of a town hall on Fox News.  

Trump won't even be interviewed by anyone not named Hannity and Sanders walks into the lion's den and kills.

People assume Trump is the favourite.  I still have a hard time believing that despite the advantages of a strong economy and incumbency.

That said, I think President Bernie Sanders gets as much done as Trump has accomplished.  It's one thing to promise everything under the sun while running, it's another to work the wheels of Congress to get your agenda passed.  I don't see Medicare for All or the Green New Deal coming close to becoming a reality unless the country is faced with an existential crisis.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, downzy said:

Whether you hate his politics or not, you have to respect Sanders for being part of a town hall on Fox News. 

Some are criticizing him for doing it, saying hes legitimatizing Fox News. I feel thats a pretty silly take. I mean its not like Fox News is some obscure far-right outlet, its the most watched cable news station. Sanders actually offers allot for working class people that watch Fox News and its good for them to hear it from his mouth without Fox News' "socialism" spin on it.

qAEnwhT.gif

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"According to the report, which cites notes taken by Jody Hunt, then-chief of staff to Mr. Sessions, when Mr. Mueller was appointed by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in May 2017, Mr. Trump slumped back in his chair and told aides, “Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I’m f---ed.”

 

I'm a little surprised he was ever that afraid. 

Edited by Jakey Styley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jakey Styley said:

Kindof ironic that in the end Trump got off the obstruction in a  similar way to how Hillary got off with the emails. 

Pretty much...

It's a matter of determining and interpreting intent.  It seems as though neither Barr as AG nor Comey as FBI Director felt either were guilty due to the lack of proving intent.  

I do wonder why Trump was so adamant of railroading the investigation if he truly wasn't guilty of conspiracy.  Coupled with the fact that the appointment of Mueller prompted him to question how long he had on the job, it raises the question of what Trump is truly worried about.  

Likely it's financial and if so, then his concerns and problems are still ongoing.  Mueller was charged with investigating conspiracy and obstruction.  I believe he directed other investigation that came as a result of his investigation to prosecutors at other districts (most notably the Southern District of NY).

I guess not abiding and abetting a foreign country is a win for Trump (that's a hell of a low standard).  But if I were Trump I'd still be worried.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 Takeaways from the Mueller Report

https://www.axios.com/mueller-report-takeaways-ee6cfae3-37e3-429e-b3c5-fcae8994b09d.html

1. The report doesn't find that Trump obstructed justice, but it also specifically doesn't exonerate him.

Mueller's team compiled 10 different episodes where Trump may have potentially committed obstruction of justice.

The report sets out from the start that the investigation accepted the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel's 2000 conclusion that a sitting president could not be charged or indicted with a crime. But it also notes that the it "recognized that a federal criminal accusation against a sitting President would place burdens on the President's capacity to govern and potentially preempt constitutional processes for addressing presidential misconduct."

The final words of the document are most telling: "Accordingly, while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him."

2. There was always a reason the potential episodes of obstruction of justice were inconclusive. 

For example, the report says Trump told then-White House Communications Director Hope Hicks and others not to disclose information about the 2016 Trump Tower meeting between top campaign officials and a Russian attorney. But Mueller wrote that "the evidence does not establish" that Trump was specifically trying to prevent Mueller's team or Congress from obtaining the emails setting up the meeting — which is the only way his actions could have been considered obstruction.

3. Many of Trump's potential efforts to obstruct the investigations against him failed after staffers rebuffed him.

Mueller's team found "multiple acts by the President that were capable of exerting undue influence over law enforcement investigations, including the Russian-interference and obstruction investigations."

The report specifically cites one-on-one meetings between Trump and top-level staffers where the president directed them to curtail investigations. For example, he asked then-White House counsel Don McGahn to have Mueller fired and requested that former staffer Corey Lewandowski ask then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions to limit the scope of the Russia investigation.

The investigation ultimately found that Trump's efforts to influence it "were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests."

4. Congress can still act against Trump on obstruction charges.

Mueller might have punted on concluding whether or not Trump committed obstruction of justice, but he leaves the door open for Congress to do so, writing that it "can validly regulate the President's exercise of official duties to prohibit actions motivated by a corrupt intent to obstruct justice."

That section of the report contains a lengthy constitutional analysis arguing that a congressional move against Trump wouldn't undermine his executive power outlined under Article II.

5. Mueller's team wasn't happy with Trump's written responses — and wanted an in-person interview — but ultimately believed their other sourcing was enough.

Upon receiving Trump's written answers in late 2018, Mueller's team notified Trump's lawyers that they were insufficient, saying "that the President stated on more than 30 occasions that he 'does not recall' or 'remember' or have an 'independent recollection' of information called for by the questions."

The investigators considered subpoenaing Trump, but ultimately decided that any benefits from an interview would be outweighed by fighting the lengthy lawsuit that would be sure to follow from the president's lawyers.

The investigation ultimately "determined that the substantial quantity of information we had obtained from other sources allowed us to draw relevant factual conclusions on intent and credibility, which are often inferred from circumstantial evidence and assessed without direct testimony from the subject of the investigation."

6. The investigation did not establish that Trump campaign members colluded with the Russian government, but the president's actions still may have influenced Russian actions.

Mueller's investigation established that although "the Russian government perceived it would benefit from a Trump presidency and worked to secure that outcome, and that the Campaign expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts, [it] did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities."

But the report details how Trump's famous July 2016 statement — "Russia if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 [Clinton] emails that are missing. I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press" — could have been effective. It states, "Within approximately five hours of Trump's statement, [Russian intelligence] officers targeted for the first time Clinton's personal office."

7. The media got a lot right in real time.

Thanks to reporting from media outlets throughout Trump's presidency, the main thrust of many of the events outlined in the report — in both its obstruction and collusion facets — were already public knowledge.

This timeline from PBS gives a sense of the scope for the reporting — from the NYT's bombshell report on the 2016 Trump Tower meeting to WaPo's more recent report on Trump's concealment of his conversations with Russian President Vladimir Putin — that provided the public's first glimpse at much of the information that forms the backbone of Mueller's report.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again the damn news bastards interrupted the last ten minutes of my soap because of this Mueller report. I'm so damn sick of hearing about this shit.

either find something or let it go! By the time the government figures out if Trump was in with the Russians, the next Presidential election will be here.

The Democrats should concentrate on getting an honest, and qualified person to run against Trump. Maybe that might help out country. Otherwise it's all bullshit.

If some of Trump's family didn't realize meeting with Russians might cause a problem then they are too stupid to live. lol

It's the same old shit every damn day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please, help me out here. I'm trying to understand this whole thing :wacko: Let's say I'm thinking about going on vacation to Europe in early July. I talk to my family. We like the idea. We check with travell agencies about hotels. We call American Airlines for tickets and we also check car rentals. Since we couldn't find the hotel we want and airline tickes were sold out for early July. We instead decide to do something else.

In what way I didn't have the intention to go to Europe? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Jakey Styley said:

"According to the report, which cites notes taken by Jody Hunt, then-chief of staff to Mr. Sessions, when Mr. Mueller was appointed by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in May 2017, Mr. Trump slumped back in his chair and told aides, “Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I’m f---ed.”

 

I'm a little surprised he was ever that afraid. 

Perspective.

This follows :

Trump allegedly said that “Everyone tells me if you get one of these independent counsels it ruins your presidency. It takes years and years and I won’t be able to do anything. This is the worst thing that ever happened to me.”

Edited by Silent Jay
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's some pretty absurd, hilarious, and downright insulting headlines from the Mueller Report:

Mueller apparently decided Don Jr. was too clueless to be prosecuted
https://news.vice.com/en_us/article/pajdqn/mueller-apparently-decided-don-jr-was-too-clueless-to-be-prosecuted?utm_medium=vicenewsfacebook&fbclid=IwAR2Zkty6lvYNz7EAemNRrfYAzOs4gGT-Cv-5fcWBn87xIuwWMJfoV9pBOsI

Mueller Report States: ‘[Sarah] Sanders Acknowledged to Investigators that Her Comments Were Not Founded on Anything’
https://secondnexus.com/news/mueller-report-sarah-sanders-lied-fbi/?utm_content=inf_10_1164_2&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=GTAK&tse_id=INF_002eca20622111e9b433ab68d22425b2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×