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'The Most Dangerous Band In The World: The Story Of Guns N' Roses' To Air On BBC FOUR In UK (Fri 5th Feb 10pm)

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It seemed a little haphazard to me.  Almost like a project someone procrastinated on then threw together at last minute. The through the rabbit hole bits were just plain weird.

I don't know how they did it, but I liked that they used GnR's music. I also liked some of the cuts between pro-shot and the not pro-shot footage. More footage would have been great though. But I did like it well enough.

I am not sure fans will ever be happy with a documentary unless it is comprehensive. It'd have to be a multi-part series of at least two hours dedicated to each part of their history. Pre-Guns, Forming of Guns and that time period, Appetite era, Creating the Illusions era and issues and triumphs, top of the world and crashing, time they were apart. Then in the future they would have to have a follow up epilogue of how they regrouped and how that regrouping went.

Then we would still be upset they didn't include things. Everyone else in the world would think we were insane and all the short little documentaries that came before were good enough regardless of how many errors were in them.

 

Edited by sanity_lost
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Funny how there were six motorcycles, but nobody interviewed Dizzy. Unless they just included Matt and Steven into the equation and left Dizzy out.

I think the part where Axl added Dizzy against the band's will might have been an interesting part. A little underplayed in GNR history.

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I thought it was good, the Behind the Music was better but they did good here. It's a tough story to tell. 

 

Got me excited about the reunion too

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Didn't like it as much as the other docs I've seen over the years, but the new footage was awesome, as was the text at the end mentioning the Coachella 2016 reunion. It's fantastic that we're finally getting a happy ending to this story. 

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It was kinda cool and corny. Once again GnR diied from the book of history in 1996. No words on Chinese

Maybe that's as it should be. Especially now. Chinese was Axl's thing but nobody else from the people this doc addressed was involved in it. They'd all left by then.

Edited by moreblack

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I found it disappointing. Totally stank of a project that was shelved and now, with the reunion materialising, threw a bit of text at the end referring to it and aired it. Got me more excited for the reunion, however!

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9 minutes ago, bigpoop said:

The best part was when Steven said he would have stopped the riot with a drum solo. :lol:

Yes. That bit made me go wtf. :facepalm:

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1 hour ago, moreblack said:

Maybe that's as it should be. Especially now. Chinese was Axl's thing but nobody else from the people this doc addressed was involved in it. They'd all left by then.

Like it or not it's still a key part of Guns N' Roses history. 

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1 hour ago, bigpoop said:

The best part was when Steven said he would have stopped the riot with a drum solo. :lol:

 

Considering this documentary could have been called GNR: The Drummers' Stories, I think Matt came out of it as the far better candidate for a reunion. Steven looked okay and isn't without charm but he still comes across as borderline insane whenever it comes to anything GNR related.

For a documentary to ever truly please fans, it's gonna need proper interviews with Axl and Izzy because they're the only ones with secrets left to tell. And from a documentary point of view, there's no getting away from the fact that the making of Chinese Democracy is probably the most interesting tale in the whole GNR saga.

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6 hours ago, Gibbo 27 said:

Am streaming it on my youtube channel if anyone wants to check it out. It starts at the 32.15 min mark 

 

this video is private??

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What's with the perfect crime doc that was mentioned here?

Btw, Steven's rehab footage was really hard to watch.

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Some fans go off on one when discussing how the band added horns and shit on the UYI tour, however on the BBC documentary last night there was footage of the last gig before they signed to Geffen, they were playing Move to the City with a horn section. I thought that was interesting as most seem to think that Axl was responsible for the horns and backing singers later on but maybe that type of thing happened from the start. To my mind the various musical backgrounds of the individual members created something amazing anyway, a punk, rock, metal, opera of a rock n roll band.

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If I recall correctly it was Duff who put that pre-signed gig horn section together. His brother was one of the players, I think.

I actually like that kind of outside the box thinking, when it comes to rock/metal music. I don't want every rock song to have horns or synths or whatever, but if they fit the song or they bring some new flair to a song, then why not? It's boring if everything is always the same old same old.

Edited by jekylhyde
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A real mixed bag.

The best part by far was Marc Canter: his interviews and the video footage he supplied was fantastic, real gems that I hope see the light of day in their entirety one day. Interviews with Zutaut were cool, too, and the UYI footage was in good quality.

The Alice in Wonderland rubbish, the titles that look like they were made by a 14-year-old in iMovie, the stock sound effects, playing Marilyn Manson's cover of Sweet Dreams over a harrowing tale of child abuse... Surprised to see all this amateur nonsense from an established music documentary filmmaker.

I'd say it's still worth a watch for hardcore fans, even if a lot the interviews are taken from previous documentaries.

In regards to how this doc got away with using so much music, the BBC has a longstanding deal with record labels about being able to use music on their broadcast TV shows. That's why the making of videos for Doctor Who could use tons of licensed tracks when they were shown on TV, but had to have that music replaced with generic stock music for the DVD release.

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Well I enjoyed it (I seem to be the only one who did!): no Dizzy Reed; next-to-no Newgnr; mostly focuses on the 80s era; GN'R as skeletal motorcyclists; clips I had certainly not seen before (e.g. the Jungle video shoot) - what is there not to like? For a newbie it evoked the era well, the riots, craziness, groupies. You would probably want to buy a copy of Appetite after watching that. For an old timer there was Canter's footage. Hopefully it will get a dvd release and they can expand the Canter footage and/or throw on some DVD extras.

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5 hours ago, bigpoop said:

The best part was when Steven said he would have stopped the riot with a drum solo. :lol:

I know. Nearly fell off sofa laughing at that.

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As expected, at the very least, this doc has divided opinion and inspired much further discussion.

One thing I wanna ask, based on the earliest comments in this thread once the doc had aired, I'm seeing a plethora of "old news", "things already know and have seen" etc.

Well, first of all, are you lot telling me that the candid audience perspective shot of the Jungle film clip is common knowledge and has been seen by a lot of you before?!? 

That's the first "unseen" footage that pops up in my mind as the doc begins and would seem to coincide with the first comments about how lacklustre it was already seeming.

Suffice to say a GN'R crowd is a tough one!

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It was a haphazard, sensationalist documentary. Heavy on the early years, scant on the later years.

The actual presentation was amateurish, from the photography to the effects work. Very low budget and hastily put together.

The bookends with the Alice in Wonderland motif was an interesting idea, but ultimately it didn't work, but the girl was mega hot. :D

I love the Canter footage, the photos etc. All this was good stuff and helps paint a picture of the band's hedonistic lifestyle. Unfortunately, the documentary focuses on the hedonism, but what about the music? They were not always high and drunk, they were unhinged creative monsters, yet we don't see enough of that side of them. And when we get to the UYI years, it becomes more about the breakdown of the band, what about the music? Let's see why they were the biggest band at the time. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15 hours ago, emybdc said:

 

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