Jump to content
AxlRoseCDII

Do you think the high ticket prices are justified because they play quite long shows?

Recommended Posts

16 hours ago, Derick said:

You're welcome. But I would tell you to keep this information with you..With all respect, It can be useful and prevent you from being ashamed. 

Don't worry, there's no shame in speaking my mind.  Especially when I'm just stating facts.  Thanks anyway for your continued concern.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Tonto said:

Not to be an asshole, but you would have gone to all 6 shows if they were cheaper?? How cheap do you expect those 6 shows to be? Clearly cheaper than a ticket to ONE show that you didn't pay for because it was too expensive? Don't get the logic, sorry. 

It's not cheap, I know, I saw them in Peru and it cost me a lot of money, but it was worth it to me. It's a big event, like you said it's an "historic moment in rock and roll history", sorry you missed it. Really.

Oh I've gone to several. I saw both MetLife shows last year (in the nosebleeds) and only made it to the second because we watched prices drop low the day of on StubHub and grabbed two more crappy seats for $86. I was also lucky enough to get into the Apollo for free which I did by running the drop line outside all day. But in advance I had made up my mind to not go to the MSG shows before then - just too much damn money.

And while maybe I wouldn't have been at 6 area shows, I probably would have been at most. The shows were spaced out among a pay period and if they were $100 for good seats, $75 for medicore, and $50 for nosebleeds, I could have spread it out and made it to a lot of them and I likely would have even gone for the $100 option because I can't help myself. So yeah, in a weird way, they would have probably gotten more money out of me if they were cheaper - instead they turned me off with what they wanted up front. I can justify going to four shows for $400, but not one show for $400. That only wreaks of cash-grab to me. 

My bigger point is that this is not just limited to GNR. U2, another of my favorite bands, was $790 for two lower level seats. This will be U2's third tour in as many years, they did a whole stadium run in 2017. They are one of the best live acts around, but they are not a specialty group, this is not a historic reunion tour, and they've released new material pretty regularly and yet they are priced virtually the same as GNR's big run. I spoke to a coworker about this yesterday and she said Adele, Beyonce, & Taylor Swift had similar price ranges. I don't follow any of them, but I believe it. Another guy who quoted my post said that his friend brought his wife and kids to see Bon Jovi and that they were priced higher than GNR's are. If you can and want to spend that money on Bon Jovi, that's your prerogative, the guy evidently did not complain during the show, nor should he (better to just enjoy it once you're there), but outside of probably putting on a good show, what commands a Bon Jovi concert to be priced at that level? And imagine spending that much money and getting a 2 hour show or even less, as some performers often do. 

I'm not whining, believe me, I'm grateful this is even happening. It's more the principle of the matter that concert prices in general are absurd. Yes, this is a special occasion, it's a big, elaborate show that they have to make money on, yes, album sales and radio play are dead, but $300 mid-range seats are way too expensive for one show. Just because they can charge it doesn't necessarily mean they should. It's like at rest stops in America, they charge exorbitant prices for food because they can and there are no other options (yes, a lot of that demands on who the supplier is, but I think you see what I'm getting at). This tour is the same way, incredibly high demand, people of course want to see Axl & Slash (and even Duff) together, so they're charging and paying a lot of money. It's all working well according to the market, but it just comes off badly in the broad scheme of things. 

It's getting harder and harder to justify spending this and I do feel bad for the guy who wants to make his family to see GNR only once and sit somewhere modest, he may not have $1000 to casually spend on a night out on just tickets and may have to miss Axl & Slash's reunion because of it. It's a shame. 

I encourage everyone to see this tour. It's a killer set, the band is on fire, and even if it cost a million/ticket it would still be great just to see them together again. But I am a mindless, massive, Axl nutter and GNR fan, I stuck with them through the graveyard years of 2002-2006, championed CD when it came out, justified Axl coming on at 11:15pm despite getting there at 6:20 to be in the GA line, and saw them repeatedly on the moderately-successful CD tours that followed, and if this is pissing me off, that's saying something. 

Edited by BangoSkank
Used wrong word
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-11-24 at 2:11 PM, BangoSkank said:

Oh I've gone to several. I saw both MetLife shows last year (in the nosebleeds) and only made it to the second because we watched prices drop low the day of on StubHub and grabbed two more crappy seats for $86. I was also lucky enough to get into the Apollo for free which I did by running the drop line outside all day. But in advance I had made up my mind to not go to the MSG shows before then - just too much damn money.

And while maybe I wouldn't have been at 6 area shows, I probably would have been at most. The shows were spaced out among a pay period and if they were $100 for good seats, $75 for medicore, and $50 for nosebleeds, I could have spread it out and made it to a lot of them and I likely would have even gone for the $100 option because I can't help myself. So yeah, in a weird way, they would have probably gotten more money out of me if they were cheaper - instead they turned me off with what they wanted up front. I can justify going to four shows for $400, but not one show for $400. That only wreaks of cash-grab to me. 

My bigger point is that this is not just limited to GNR. U2, another of my favorite bands, was $790 for two lower level seats. This will be U2's third tour in as many years, they did a whole stadium run in 2017. They are one of the best live acts around, but they are not a specialty group, this is not a historic reunion tour, and they've released new material pretty regularly and yet they are priced virtually the same as GNR's big run. I spoke to a coworker about this yesterday and she said Adele, Beyonce, & Taylor Swift had similar price ranges. I don't follow any of them, but I believe it. Another guy who quoted my post said that his friend brought his wife and kids to see Bon Jovi and that they were priced higher than GNR's are. If you can and want to spend that money on Bon Jovi, that's your prerogative, the guy evidently did not complain during the show, nor should he (better to just enjoy it once you're there), but outside of probably putting on a good show, what commands a Bon Jovi concert to be priced at that level? And imagine spending that much money and getting a 2 hour show or even less, as some performers often do. 

I'm not whining, believe me, I'm grateful this is even happening. It's more the principle of the matter that concert prices in general are absurd. Yes, this is a special occasion, it's a big, elaborate show that they have to make money on, yes, album sales and radio play are dead, but $300 mid-range seats are way too expensive for one show. Just because they can charge it doesn't necessarily mean they should. It's like at rest stops in America, they charge exorbitant prices for food because they can and there are no other options (yes, a lot of that demands on who the supplier is, but I think you see what I'm getting at). This tour is the same way, incredibly high demand, people of course want to see Axl & Slash (and even Duff) together, so they're charging and paying a lot of money. It's all working well according to the market, but it just comes off badly in the broad scheme of things. 

It's getting harder and harder to justify spending this and I do feel bad for the guy who wants to make his family to see GNR only once and sit somewhere modest, he may not have $1000 to casually spend on a night out on just tickets and may have to miss Axl & Slash's reunion because of it. It's a shame. 

I encourage everyone to see this tour. It's a killer set, the band is on fire, and even if it cost a million/ticket it would still be great just to see them together again. But I am a mindless, massive, Axl nutter and GNR fan, I stuck with them through the graveyard years of 2002-2006, championed CD when it came out, justified Axl coming on at 11:15pm despite getting there at 6:20 to be in the GA line, and saw them repeatedly on the moderately-successful CD tours that followed, and if this is pissing me off, that's saying something. 

The reason ticket prices are so expensive is because there is a monopoly between Ticketmaster (the ones selling the tickets) and LiveNation (the ones who own the rights to pretty much all the big venues in North America). Both companies merged a few years ago. That means that if a big band wants to tour and play stadiums or arenas (even theatres), they have to deal with LN, and that means they have to also do their business with TM.

TM artificially brings the ticket prices up. How does that happen?

- Let’s say GNR are playing a big venue in NY. The venue capacity for the show is 50,000 people.

- When the tickets go on sale, TM doesn’t release all of them, just a small portion. If there is enough demand, those tickets will sell quickly, and if you don’t act fast, they will be gone. There are still a lot of seats available, but they don’t show on their website. So, instead of risking missing the show, people go to StubHub (which is promoted on the TicketMaster website). TM pretty much tells you “boo-hoo all tickets are gone! But don’t panic, click here to go to SH where you might find tickets available” before warning you that it is a resale site, therefore tickets might be above face value. Funny thing is that TM and SH are one and the same. TM owns SH. The business model is pretty clear: they divert tickets to that SCALPER website so you pay more for your tickets.

- If tickets are not selling as quickly as projected, they will release another batch of tickets through TM. That’s why if you go to TM a few weeks after it shows there are no available tickets, you might be in for a surprise. And they do this bullshit all the way to the very same day of the show.

- They have been doing this for years, easily a decade, before TM and LN merged. They exploited that scalping system to drive ticket prices up, and it worked wonders for them, because they realized that people are willing to pay (much) more for a hot show they don’t wanna miss.

- the way it used to be before the merger: same scheme, but the prices listed on those limited tickets on TM were more fair, just at a regular price you would expect for the show you wanted to attend. But since people decided to go to SH, so they wouldn’t miss the show, and payed those inflated prices, the scumbags at TM learned their lesson and started using those inflated SH prices as their standard price through TM.

 

They are artificially driving the prices up. This is not simply a “supply and demand” thing, because they control and limit the supply to make more money out of all us. It is a legalized SCAM.

 

The big problem is that LN owns the rights to most big venues in North America (and even in South America. Not sure if it is the same in Europe), so unless the band decides to play small venues that are not run by LN, we are all screwed.

Now, in the specific case of NITL, on top of that dirty scheme, you have to add the fact that allegedly GNR are getting paid what... $2M per show? Guess where that money is coming from.

 

We have only ONE company controlling the live entertainment market (concerts, stand-up comedy, sports events, theatre, opera, musicals, etc). But it’s not just the problem of a monopoly. On top of that they maliciously manipulate the market to artificially bring the prices up using a scheme that pretty much FORCED fans to pay more and that way set a much higher standard price for shows that would otherwise be much more affordable.

 

It’s absolute total 100% bullshit.

Edited by tremolo
  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, tremolo said:

The reason ticket prices are so expensive is because there is a monopoly between Ticketmaster (the ones selling the tickets) and LiveNation (the ones who own the rights to pretty much all the big venues in North America). Both companies merged a few years ago. That means that if a big band wants to tour and play stadiums or arenas (even theatres), they have to deal with LN, and that means they have to also do their business with TM.

TM artificially brings the ticket prices up. How does that happen?

- Let’s say GNR are playing a big venue in NY. The venue capacity for the show is 50,000 people.

- When the tickets go on sale, TM doesn’t release all of them, just a small portion. If there is enough demand, those tickets will sell quickly, and if you don’t act fast, they will be gone. There are still a lot of seats available, but they don’t show on their website. So, instead of risking missing the show, people go to StubHub (which is promoted on the TicketMaster website). TM pretty much tells you “boo-hoo all tickets are gone! But don’t panic, click here to go to SH where you might find tickets available” before warning you that it is a resale site, therefore tickets might be above face value. Funny thing is that TM and SH are one and the same. TM owns SH. The business model is pretty clear: they divert tickets to that SCALPER website so you pay more for your tickets.

- If tickets are not selling as quickly as projected, they will release another batch of tickets through TM. That’s why if you go to TM a few weeks after it shows there are no available tickets, you might be in for a surprise. And they do this bullshit all the way to the very same day of the show.

- They have been doing this for years, easily a decade, before TM and LN merged. They exploited that scalping system to drive ticket prices up, and it worked wonders for them, because they realized that people are willing to pay (much) more for a hot show they don’t wanna miss.

- the way it used to be before the merger: same scheme, but the prices listed on those limited tickets on TM were more fair, just at a regular price you would expect for the show you wanted to attend. But since people decided to go to SH, so they wouldn’t miss the show, and payed those inflated prices, the scumbags at TM learned their lesson and started using those inflated SH prices as their standard price through TM.

 

They are artificially driving the prices up. This is not simply a “supply and demand” thing, because they control and limit the supply to make more money out of all us. It is a legalized SCAM.

 

The big problem is that LN owns the rights to most big venues in North America (and even in South America. Not sure if it is the same in Europe), so unless the band decides to play small venues that are not run by LN, we are all screwed.

Now, in the specific case of NITL, on top of that dirty scheme, you have to add the fact that allegedly GNR are getting paid what... $2M per show? Guess where that money is coming from.

 

We have only ONE company controlling the live entertainment market (concerts, stand-up comedy, sports events, theatre, opera, musicals, etc). But it’s not just the problem of a monopoly. On top of that they maliciously manipulate the market to artificially bring the prices up using a scheme that pretty much FORCED fans to pay more and that way set a much higher standard price for shows that would otherwise be much more affordable.

 

It’s absolute total 100% bullshit.

You has very good explicative, a shame 😠

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, tremolo said:

The reason ticket prices are so expensive is because there is a monopoly between Ticketmaster (the ones selling the tickets) and LiveNation (the ones who own the rights to pretty much all the big venues in North America). Both companies merged a few years ago. That means that if a big band wants to tour and play stadiums or arenas (even theatres), they have to deal with LN, and that means they have to also do their business with TM.

TM artificially brings the ticket prices up. How does that happen?

- Let’s say GNR are playing a big venue in NY. The venue capacity for the show is 50,000 people.

- When the tickets go on sale, TM doesn’t release all of them, just a small portion. If there is enough demand, those tickets will sell quickly, and if you don’t act fast, they will be gone. There are still a lot of seats available, but they don’t show on their website. So, instead of risking missing the show, people go to StubHub (which is promoted on the TicketMaster website). TM pretty much tells you “boo-hoo all tickets are gone! But don’t panic, click here to go to SH where you might find tickets available” before warning you that it is a resale site, therefore tickets might be above face value. Funny thing is that TM and SH are one and the same. TM owns SH. The business model is pretty clear: they divert tickets to that SCALPER website so you pay more for your tickets.

- If tickets are not selling as quickly as projected, they will release another batch of tickets through TM. That’s why if you go to TM a few weeks after it shows there are no available tickets, you might be in for a surprise. And they do this bullshit all the way to the very same day of the show.

- They have been doing this for years, easily a decade, before TM and LN merged. They exploited that scalping system to drive ticket prices up, and it worked wonders for them, because they realized that people are willing to pay (much) more for a hot show they don’t wanna miss.

- the way it used to be before the merger: same scheme, but the prices listed on those limited tickets on TM were more fair, just at a regular price you would expect for the show you wanted to attend. But since people decided to go to SH, so they wouldn’t miss the show, and payed those inflated prices, the scumbags at TM learned their lesson and started using those inflated SH prices as their standard price through TM.

 

They are artificially driving the prices up. This is not simply a “supply and demand” thing, because they control and limit the supply to make more money out of all us. It is a legalized SCAM.

 

The big problem is that LN owns the rights to most big venues in North America (and even in South America. Not sure if it is the same in Europe), so unless the band decides to play small venues that are not run by LN, we are all screwed.

Now, in the specific case of NITL, on top of that dirty scheme, you have to add the fact that allegedly GNR are getting paid what... $2M per show? Guess where that money is coming from.

 

We have only ONE company controlling the live entertainment market (concerts, stand-up comedy, sports events, theatre, opera, musicals, etc). But it’s not just the problem of a monopoly. On top of that they maliciously manipulate the market to artificially bring the prices up using a scheme that pretty much FORCED fans to pay more and that way set a much higher standard price for shows that would otherwise be much more affordable.

 

It’s absolute total 100% bullshit.

Well. This is a good overview, but not entirely true. There isn't only one company. There is Live Nation, but there is also AEG, who probably owns the other half of major venues, like the Staples Center and the forum in L.A. and the O2 in London. So it's a duopoly. :P Also Stubhub has nothing to do with Ticketmaster. Stubhub is owned by Ebay. Ticketmaster does have their own third party reseller site/sell those tickets on Ticketmaster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i took a friend (a casual fan) to the 2nd msg show.  our seats were lower level behind the soundboard, 180$ each.  he thought it was worth every penny.  he couldn't believe how long the band played and how good they sounded.  i've gone to 3 shows since last summer and each show was worth what i paid......to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well since we´re talkin´about TM,LN and AEG...What happened in 2010 that the band was unable to tour in the US? Does it have anything to do with this monopoly? Anything to do with that Irving Azoff problem? At that time AEG already existed? To this ticket thing, is there only TM?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/26/2017 at 7:52 AM, tremolo said:

The reason ticket prices are so expensive is because there is a monopoly between Ticketmaster (the ones selling the tickets) and LiveNation (the ones who own the rights to pretty much all the big venues in North America). Both companies merged a few years ago. That means that if a big band wants to tour and play stadiums or arenas (even theatres), they have to deal with LN, and that means they have to also do their business with TM.

TM artificially brings the ticket prices up. How does that happen?

- Let’s say GNR are playing a big venue in NY. The venue capacity for the show is 50,000 people.

- When the tickets go on sale, TM doesn’t release all of them, just a small portion. If there is enough demand, those tickets will sell quickly, and if you don’t act fast, they will be gone. There are still a lot of seats available, but they don’t show on their website. So, instead of risking missing the show, people go to StubHub (which is promoted on the TicketMaster website). TM pretty much tells you “boo-hoo all tickets are gone! But don’t panic, click here to go to SH where you might find tickets available” before warning you that it is a resale site, therefore tickets might be above face value. Funny thing is that TM and SH are one and the same. TM owns SH. The business model is pretty clear: they divert tickets to that SCALPER website so you pay more for your tickets.

- If tickets are not selling as quickly as projected, they will release another batch of tickets through TM. That’s why if you go to TM a few weeks after it shows there are no available tickets, you might be in for a surprise. And they do this bullshit all the way to the very same day of the show.

- They have been doing this for years, easily a decade, before TM and LN merged. They exploited that scalping system to drive ticket prices up, and it worked wonders for them, because they realized that people are willing to pay (much) more for a hot show they don’t wanna miss.

- the way it used to be before the merger: same scheme, but the prices listed on those limited tickets on TM were more fair, just at a regular price you would expect for the show you wanted to attend. But since people decided to go to SH, so they wouldn’t miss the show, and payed those inflated prices, the scumbags at TM learned their lesson and started using those inflated SH prices as their standard price through TM.

 

They are artificially driving the prices up. This is not simply a “supply and demand” thing, because they control and limit the supply to make more money out of all us. It is a legalized SCAM.

 

The big problem is that LN owns the rights to most big venues in North America (and even in South America. Not sure if it is the same in Europe), so unless the band decides to play small venues that are not run by LN, we are all screwed.

Now, in the specific case of NITL, on top of that dirty scheme, you have to add the fact that allegedly GNR are getting paid what... $2M per show? Guess where that money is coming from.

 

We have only ONE company controlling the live entertainment market (concerts, stand-up comedy, sports events, theatre, opera, musicals, etc). But it’s not just the problem of a monopoly. On top of that they maliciously manipulate the market to artificially bring the prices up using a scheme that pretty much FORCED fans to pay more and that way set a much higher standard price for shows that would otherwise be much more affordable.

 

It’s absolute total 100% bullshit.

Although a few of these details are off (apparently SH is owned by Ebay, etc.), this is a great post. The entire ticket system is dripping with bullshit. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×