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Gilby considers himself "pretty good at picking out guitar parts", but he picked them all wrong at least once -- by his own admission

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43 minutes ago, Ratam said:

would be good hear the original song , maybe some.outtakes, I be curious if the original song exist.

yeah that would be fantastic

i truly hope it exists

and i truly hope it surfaces some day!

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10 hours ago, EvanG said:

Maybe he was too, who knows? I just know that Duff talked about this a lot, being a drummer, guitarist, and bassplayer, therefore being able to put everything sorta together when they were working on songs.

He talks about it in this clip too.

 

 

Gee he was really starting a dowhill slide health wise at this stage. 

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12 hours ago, ludurigan said:

Duff apparently says some non-true stuff in his book (probably not on purpose), for example he said that he and slash wrote Pretty Tied Up in Chicago, which is probably not true, since by all accounts it was Izzy who wrote it and apparently izzy didnt hang around long enough in Chicago to write with them

Yeah, could be, I wouldn't know. But Izzy did send in a lot of songs on tape at the time. So Slash and Duff probably worked on a lot of Izzy songs in Chicago, writing guitar solos over it, adding bass lines, etc. Bands often say ''we wrote that song'', meaning everyone added their own instrumental parts to the song, while in reality only one person wrote the original composition. I don't think that for a lot of Izzy songs, especially at the time of UYI when they weren't really communicating like before, Izzy would tell Duff how to play the bass lines and Slash how to play the guitar solo.

Edited by EvanG

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1 hour ago, EvanG said:

Yeah, could be, I wouldn't know. But Izzy did send in a lot of songs on tape at the time. So Slash and Duff probably worked on a lot of Izzy songs in Chicago, writing guitar solos over it, adding bass lines, etc. Bands often say ''we wrote that song'', meaning everyone added their own instrumental parts to the song, while in reality only one person wrote the original composition. I don't think that for a lot of Izzy songs, especially at the time of UYI when they weren't really communicating like before, Izzy would tell Duff how to play the bass lines and Slash how to play the guitar solo.

yeah it is possible but i suppose izzy sending tapes was later in the process? like on the actual sessions in LA and stuff? not sure

oh sure

i don't think izzy ever told slash or duff how to play

i don't think slash ever told izzy or duff how to play

i don't think duff ever told slash or izzy how to play

by all accounts, izzy and slash had a "unspoken chemistry", both have said that several times in various interviews as you are probably aware of

slash would come up with something and izzy would write "around it" to "complement it" or to "push it forward" etc

same when izzy came up with something... slash would then add stuff "around it" or "over it"

apparently they didn't need much spoken communication to achieve that

10 hours ago, Sydney Fan said:

Gee he was really starting a dowhill slide health wise at this stage. 

yes

during his solo tour it gets pretty scary

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From a "new" (=not from the ones that have been circulating online) interview with Duff in 1993:

------

Speaking of ‘Appetite’ - were the real song credits on that album all down to the whole band as the sleeve claims?
 

“Yeah, because that’s how we always write our songs. On the ‘Illusion’ records it said that certain people wrote the songs but moneywise we still split it all equal. At the end of the day I’m proud of what I did and I know I did it. It doesn’t matter to me if other people think I’m just a bass player and that I don’t write any songs.
 
I know in my own heart what happened, so...”
 
Didn’t you write that drum intro to You Could Be Mine?
 

“That’s a very good question because I was actually in court yesterday saying that. Steven Adler [original drummer with GN’R] is suing us and his lawsuit has finally gone to court [since we spoke GN’R settled out of court by giving Adler $1.65m]; I had to get on a stand yesterday with a jury and everything, and explain what a drum edit was, and what a riff was.
 
“But yes, I used to get behind the kit when Steven was in the band. That song was written for ‘Appetite’ and at that time Slash and I would have to try and explain to Steven how the drum part should go; I’d have to tell Slashto chill out and I’d do it - a guitar player relating to a drummer just doesn’t work.
 
So I ended up getting behind the drum kit and showing Steve. I’m not technically a great drummer but I know how to get the playing across. And that’s what I testified yesterday, too.”
 
It was Adler’s insistence on ‘dancing with Mr Brownstone’, long after the rest of the band had given up such terpsichorean pleasures, that saw him phased out and replaced by Cult drummer Matt Sorum.
 

“We’d been trying for over a year to help Steven and get him straight because we didn’t want to kick him out of the band.
 
But enough was enough and we’d wasted a lot of money and effort.

http://www.a-4-d.com/t3255-1993-11-dd-guitarist-magazine-loose-cannon-duff

Edited by Blackstar
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I've mentioned this before on here, but I have an interview with Duff from 1993 when he was promoting Believe In Me (I don't think it's online because I can't find it) where he says that he wrote a lot more for the UYI records than he got credit for. 

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Just been reading this thread and wanted to add that it was Duff who came up with the intro to YCBM, but not the drum intro as we know it.

I'm a drummer and that was one of my favourite drum intros starting out (still is). Matt told me the stammered snare drum pattern at the beginning (the part that makes it so epic) was an accident he did in the studio and it stuck. That drum track was recorded in one take!

Edited by DeathCubeUK

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9 hours ago, Blackstar said:

From a "new" (=not from the ones that have been circulating online) interview with Duff in 1993:

------

Speaking of ‘Appetite’ - were the real song credits on that album all down to the whole band as the sleeve claims?
 

“Yeah, because that’s how we always write our songs. On the ‘Illusion’ records it said that certain people wrote the songs but moneywise we still split it all equal. At the end of the day I’m proud of what I did and I know I did it. It doesn’t matter to me if other people think I’m just a bass player and that I don’t write any songs.
 
I know in my own heart what happened, so...”
 
Didn’t you write that drum intro to You Could Be Mine?
 

“That’s a very good question because I was actually in court yesterday saying that. Steven Adler [original drummer with GN’R] is suing us and his lawsuit has finally gone to court [since we spoke GN’R settled out of court by giving Adler $1.65m]; I had to get on a stand yesterday with a jury and everything, and explain what a drum edit was, and what a riff was.
 
“But yes, I used to get behind the kit when Steven was in the band. That song was written for ‘Appetite’ and at that time Slash and I would have to try and explain to Steven how the drum part should go; I’d have to tell Slashto chill out and I’d do it - a guitar player relating to a drummer just doesn’t work.
 
So I ended up getting behind the drum kit and showing Steve. I’m not technically a great drummer but I know how to get the playing across. And that’s what I testified yesterday, too.”
 
It was Adler’s insistence on ‘dancing with Mr Brownstone’, long after the rest of the band had given up such terpsichorean pleasures, that saw him phased out and replaced by Cult drummer Matt Sorum.
 

“We’d been trying for over a year to help Steven and get him straight because we didn’t want to kick him out of the band.
 
But enough was enough and we’d wasted a lot of money and effort.

http://www.a-4-d.com/t3255-1993-11-dd-guitarist-magazine-loose-cannon-duff

"Terpsichorean pleasures" awesome.

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8 hours ago, EvanG said:

I've mentioned this before on here, but I have an interview with Duff from 1993 when he was promoting Believe In Me (I don't think it's online because I can't find it) where he says that he wrote a lot more for the UYI records than he got credit for. 

Was that in Q magazine?.

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12 hours ago, Sydney Fan said:

Was that in Q magazine?.

It was a different magazine, but maybe it came from Q magazine. I don't know.

He mentioned that because of his solo album a lot of people realized that he wrote more for the UYI than he got credit for. He talked about the other guys' egos and that they were fighting over whose name should be first, so he told them to leave his name out of it, because it wasn't worth fighting over.

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Loada Bollocks Topic. 

Gilby picked out parts of MC5 songs, a band with 2 guitar players both of whom mixed Rhythm and Lead playing. Kramer plays a single E string and sometimes E power chord in a song like kick out the jams while Fred Smith plays the same thing an octave higher on the A string. Both then play 2 note chords at parts on the G&B string. That’s one song. When you pick out guitar parts you play an approximation of what you’re hearing. In this instance Guilby is playing 2 guys parts who play in slightly different styles and blur the lines between rhythm and lead. 

Fucking sure Wayne Kramer could teach him a lot. I saw Kramer & Kim Thayil together on the MC50 tour and parts I thought Kramer played, it was Fred Smith originally... Same goes for any band with more than one guitar player. You play the song, not each guitar part exactly. Solos yes, with a bit of improv where you can, but a band like the MC5 is almost a wall of sound you decipher and replicate on one guitar. 

Gilby got shafted soundwise a lot in Guns, but when I hear him play in shows from 93 where I can hear him, he’s perfect. No Izzy, but solid and maybe a better foil for slash on a song like double talkin jive than Izzy was. (Irony) 

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Well, considering that Izzy's amps apparently had to be turned down half the time because he wasn't playing his own part correctly, there's a good chance that Gilby was playing the rhythm parts more accurately even if not 100%...

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On 16.01.2019 at 3:27 AM, ludurigan said:

This is a bit from a Gilby Clarke interview on Rock Talk With Mitch Lafon

He talks about playing with Wayne Kramer on a tribute to the MC5...

 

"When I first sat down with him to learn the songs, you know, I'm pretty good at picking out guitar parts on records, and when I sat down with him - man did I have them wrong. When he showed me what the parts really were, I'm not kidding, it blew my mind."

 

source: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/ex-gnr_guitarist_gilby_clarke_i_was_beyond_stunned_to_see_axl__slash_reunite.html

 

 

SO Gilby considers himself "pretty good at picking out guitar parts on records"

BUT he picked the guitar parts of an album all wrong at least once -- by his own admission

 

YEAH I would go even further and say that it happened at least twice

YES i am talking about the izzy's parts that gilby "picked" on GNR songs

 

i think if gilby sat down with izzy and izzy were to show him what the parts really are, then gilby's mind would blow even harder

Would he still give a fuck more than 25 years later? 

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On 1/16/2019 at 8:28 AM, ludurigan said:

maybe because i have been listening to that band 92-93 live recordings for 25 years now and I always thought that "this doesn't sound right"?

and now I may have found (additional) information that may explain why said band never sounded right to my ears?

something I have always suspected -- Gilby wasn't playing the songs properly?

this "Gilby picks guitar parts wrong" information adds to a much more famous Gilby tale (also via his own mouth) that when he was learning the songs Slash told him something like "Hey, you are playing my parts"... (additional evidence that Gilby can't pick parts that good)... and then Slash told him something like "no one really knew what Izzy played"

You put A plus B and it gets pretty obvious why it never sounded right

 

 

 

May be true but if Izzy didn’t care to teach him why should we. He played it as good if not better than anyone since Izzy 

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On 1/16/2019 at 9:15 AM, soon said:

Gilby has spoken about how he accidentally learnt Slashs rhythm parts because those were the ones audible on UYI songs. And Slash corrected him. From there Slash asked Gilby to change some parts to be different from Izzys - more streamlined. And Gilby also worked with Duff to try and put together what Izzy was doing in the inaudible parts.

Its all hilarious and Spinal Tap. Why wouldnt they be able to make available isolated Izzy tracks? Why did Slash wanna bury Izzys parts with his own on the album but apparently want the reverse live? And I imagine that the parts Slash wanted to change would be from AFD and Lies tunes where Izzys parts matter more. Those parts he wanted Slash-ified. And the UYI stuff he wanted Izzy-fied. Its bonkers!

Now we know the reason. It’s all about stripping Izzy of his “Loot”

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