Jump to content
Original

Happy Bday to Appetite for Destruction

Recommended Posts

I am out of reactions for today. I wanted to send you a rose.

what an album. That’s what they were called back to then lol.

A real rock and roll group and that AFD , but not heavy metal, but not medium rock, but more rock heavy  ,  but fun rock n roll but not glam, cheese but GnR  and AFD set them apart from hair bands of then, but...

You see where I am going with my post, I hope.

AFD just ricked hard , the whole thing. This was not a ballard cute, chessey, album.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Original said:

July 21, 1987.   A day that changed rock n roll!  

Not really. It did almost nothing until the summer of 1988. Def Leppard's Hysteria had the the same issue. Released in 1987 but took a whole year to catch on, thanks to MTV. Metallica, Poison, Living Colour and Bon Jovi were all pretty big bands that year too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I remember being at a kegger(probably in the fall of '87), we were playing whiffle ball and someone put on Appetite. I mentioned to someone that I liked it and if he knew anything about the band.  He said not really except that the singer was a "wormy looking dude" and the guitar player looked like Cousin It from the Addams Family.  That was my indoctrination to Appetite and to Guns.

Edited by lame ass security
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Celebrating AFD: My favorite guitar cover of my favorite song from the album, I love this. 

You can post covers here, right? 

Edited by Fourteenbeers
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Ultimate Classic rock site have an interesting article by Art Tavana about "AFD".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, Fourteenbeers said:

Celebrating AFD: My favorite guitar cover of my favorite song from the album, I love this. 

You can post covers here, right? 

Amazing:headbang:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best rock album of the 80's.  One of the best of all-time.  I still remember my friend bringing the cassette over and playing it for me.  I instantly gravitated to the interplay of Izzy and Slash.  I just knew this album was gonna be huge.  Of course, it did take a while for it to catch on in a grand scale.  But it will always go down as one of rock's best!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Fourteenbeers said:

Celebrating AFD: My favorite guitar cover of my favorite song from the album, I love this. 

You can post covers here, right? 

Well done, and extra marks for the pepe le pew shirt. Need to watch the tokyo vids

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a little road trip on Sunday and played all of Appetite in the car. This has gotta be the best road trip album. Doesn’t get any better than cranking the volume on Appetite and hauling ass down the highway!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Original said:

Kinda fun.  I knew 11 of the 16.   -  16 FACTS YOU PROBABLY DIDN’T KNOW https://loudwire.com/guns-n-roses-appetite-for-destruction-facts/

About fact #7: the version I always heard is that the intro/lyrics to Paradise City were written on the way home to L.A. after a concert in San Francisco with Jetboy, while the article says this happened on the way back from Seattle/Hell Tour and it's the first time I hear this story. Does anyone know more?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Twinaleblood said:

About fact #7: the version I always heard is that the intro/lyrics to Paradise City were written on the way home to L.A. after a concert in San Francisco with Jetboy, while the article says this happened on the way back from Seattle/Hell Tour and it's the first time I hear this story. Does anyone know more?

I think I remember reading it was written on the way back from the Hell Tour as well.. but who knows. Don1t think they know exactly either...

"Who wrote Don't Cry? I did." LMAO 😂 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

About Fact number 8: 350k back then were a decent sum for a nobody's band at their debut. But for Geffen, it was nothing and it was probably among the best return on investment (ROI) they ever saw in such a short time. Even for the first few months (until WTTJ started airing in Spet. 1987, which according to this, was the turning point: https://loudwire.com/guns-n-roses-appetite-for-destruction-album-anniversary/ ) of "failure" at 250k copies sold, assuming a rounded gross profit of $7 (10 bucks suggested retail price average between all formats minus royalties, which were rather low, as per Alan Niven), then the net return was more than 100% (assuming 50/50 distribution splits as Geffen often mentions...), in about, let's round up and say, 3-4 full months (end of July till October 1987). They could break even on just the production costs in 3-4 months. 

Then of course, the band was costing tons more in advances, touring and keeping them all alive or at least out of jail, but that is another story altogether. And this was probably the source of the dissatisfaction at Geffen, I guess, with Appetite "failure" at first. GNR members were a liability outside of their music, too much risk... SO, they wanted GNR to stop touring after 3 months and record another album? I think they knew where the liabilities/risk were and where the return would be. If the band blew big like Zutaut was claiming, well... huge Risk/Reward. Why? Because they knew already they could break even, even for a lofty 350k production budget on a totally unknown band.

Edited by AncientEvil80
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, AncientEvil80 said:

About Fact number 8: 350k back then were a decent sum for a nobody's band at their debut. But for Geffen, it was nothing and it was probably among the best return on investment (ROI) they ever saw in such a short time. Even for the first few months (until WTTJ started airing in Spet. 1987, which according to this, was the turning point: https://loudwire.com/guns-n-roses-appetite-for-destruction-album-anniversary/ ) of "failure" at 250k copies sold, assuming a rounded gross profit of $7 (10 bucks suggested retail price average between all formats minus royalties, which were rather low, as per Alan Niven), then the net return was more than 100% (assuming 50/50 distribution splits as Geffen often mentions...), in about, let's round up and say, 3-4 full months (end of July till October 1987). They could break even on just the production costs in 3-4 months. 

Then of course, the band was costing tons more in advances, touring and keeping them all alive or at least out of jail, but that is another story altogether. And this was probably the source of the dissatisfaction at Geffen, I guess, with Appetite "failure" at first. GNR members were a liability outside of their music, too much risk... SO, they wanted GNR to stop touring after 3 months and record another album? I think they knew where the liabilities/risk were and where the return would be. If the band blew big like Zutaut was claiming, well... huge Risk/Reward. Why? Because they knew already they could break even, even for a lofty 350k production budget on a totally unknown band.

Good analysis.   Reading that, it made me wonder if record companies ever took out life insurance policies on high risk bands like Guns. It would make sense but I don't know if it was done.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Im thinking that since we know that the band blew their advance on drugs that additional monies were put forward there after by the label, driving up the original budget. Yeah, they must of had faith in Zutaut and co. 

Speculation: The band founded Uzi Suicide and recorded and pressed LLAS with a portion of that cash?

Also, tape can get expensive. It was cheaper then, when it was mass produced, but reels were still pricey. And with tape the process is drawn out, making per diems a larger expense. You record some guitar takes that Clink likes and he and the gang spend the rest of the 'day' cutting the takes. And off goes Izzy to the bar to spend some more advance money. Also, given all the down time, thats why 'destination studios' were more common then - they needed a cool vibe and activities for the artists waiting on the belaboured tape process. Those destination studios cost way more then what most artists use today. Anyone know how ornate Rumbo was (iirc Rumbo is where they did AFD?)

Edited by soon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
45 minutes ago, lame ass security said:

Good analysis.   Reading that, it made me wonder if record companies ever took out life insurance policies on high risk bands like Guns. It would make sense but I don't know if it was done.

Probably. Why not? LOL

Although 500-600k (AFD prod. + advances/life expenses from 1986 since signing) was not much back then for Geffen, especially for 3 months. I think I read somewhere that Geffen revenue for 1988 exceeded $100 million. $8-10 million a month in revenue gets you some wide, VERY wide lines of credit with a lot of primary banks. Basically they could do whatever they wanted.

Edited by AncientEvil80
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/21/2019 at 8:20 AM, Original said:

July 21, 1987.   A day that changed rock n roll!  

You said it! Still listening to this cd. Love every damn song. The updated copy is awesome too. Don't have to put it up too loud to rock!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×