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I can't make it out the writing is too small, does it say The Holy Duran ? if it has anything to do with Simon Le Bon then it's a no from me

Only for political reasons

I used to like rock stars but I now find them the most vacuous old boring farts ever. Unless there is a bit of substance there like The Beatles or the Who. The rock star cliche is as rank as Slash's l

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46 minutes ago, wondering where's izzy? said:

How was that? Just curious since the ideas gave birth to so many atrocities. I bet it was fascinating.

 

Its a quick read if your curious, just check it out! https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/

I'd note that it did not inspire the French, Dutch, English and Spanish to colonize The Americas by way of genocide and dispossession. It didnt inspire the Trans Atlantic slave trade that built the United States. Nor did it inspire Islamic State. This, to me, suggests that it is the existence of the State itslef that is to be held to the highest scrutiny and even contempt, no matter of the States ideology. And as a pleasant twist Marx envisioned the prols eventually making the State obsolete :headbang:

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currently reading a history book about the region of flanders in the years 1648 - 1815 because I want to know how my known ancestors lived.

England, france, spain and holland all fought for this little wealthy  of land, now called belgium.

just more proof that size does not matter, it's what you do with it that counts.

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19 minutes ago, DieselDaisy said:

Just about all of Marx's predictions turned out to be bollocks.

Hmm, well, yes and no. But luckily Marxist cannon includes all sorts of criticisms and corrections, anyways.

I think you are referring to Marx's notion of Historical Determinism? Which, yes, many of his contemporaries disagreed with too. Most notably many of the anarchist contingent of the First International. But Marxs other 'predictions' have consistently proven themselves - The idea that Capitalism cannot be tamed, the fact that workers will see and feel its contradictions and desire a more just employment situation. And it is these true and salient points that are brought forward in the manifesto.

Even Trotsky disagreed with Marxs predictions about state power. Just as when we say "Marx" in context of the manifesto, we actually mean Marx and Engels. So to when we say "Marxist thought", we mean a huge group of people. So we can hold his very astute critique of capitalism dear while having different prescriptions for what to do about it, just as many Marxists have done over the years. Therefore his prediction about the central importance of the proletariat in their own liberation is also true.

 

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10 minutes ago, soon said:

Hmm, well, yes and no. But luckily Marxist cannon includes all sorts of criticisms and corrections, anyways.

I think you are referring to Marx's notion of Historical Determinism? Which, yes, many of his contemporaries disagreed with too. Most notably many of the anarchist contingent of the First International. But Marxs other 'predictions' have consistently proven themselves - The idea that Capitalism cannot be tamed, the fact that workers will see and feel its contradictions and desire a more just employment situation. And it is these true and salient points that are brought forward in the manifesto.

Even Trotsky disagreed with Marxs predictions about state power. Just as when we say "Marx" in context of the manifesto, we actually mean Marx and Engels. So to when we say "Marxist thought", we mean a huge group of people. So we can hold his very astute critique of capitalism dear while having different prescriptions for what to do about it, just as many Marxists have done over the years. Therefore his prediction about the central importance of the proletariat in their own liberation is also true.

 

It is all a load of cobblers really and led to some of the most brutal regimes in history.

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2 hours ago, action said:

currently reading a history book about the region of flanders in the years 1648 - 1815 because I want to know how my known ancestors lived.

England, france, spain and holland all fought for this little wealthy  of land, now called belgium.

just more proof that size does not matter, it's what you do with it that counts.

Sounds fascinating. Im curious, why is the land so wealthy and sought after? i think many of us over here - certainly myself - just think that the rich Euro nations simply have "old money." That old school aristocracy just handed down wealth from a past era. But I figure there must be resources or trade passages that bring wealth to Belgium?

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1 minute ago, soon said:

Sounds fascinating. Im curious, why is the land so wealthy and sought after? i think many of us over here - certainly myself - just think that the rich Euro nations simply have "old money." That old school aristocracy just handed down wealth from a past era. But I figure there must be resources or trade passages that bring wealth to Belgium?

belgium was just very fertile ground back in the day, close to the sea and traversed by many rivers.

also, belgium is stuck right in the middle between england, france, germany and the netherlands. when goods travel, good chance they have to pass through belgium's harbors or railways. you remember that pestering kid at school that said "when you want to pass here, you have to pay toll"? that's belgium. except, we didn't get the chance to ask "toll", since at any point in time somebody else called the shots on our ground. spain, austria, france,... they all bossed us around

 

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44 minutes ago, DieselDaisy said:

Bruges and Antwerp were major trading ports, the Hanseatic League. The prosperity of the country was built on trade and manufacturing, especially textiles.

england shit their pants for antwerp. that was, until holland closed it.

we were always held back by outsiders

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22 minutes ago, action said:

england shit their pants for antwerp. that was, until holland closed it.

we were always held back by outsiders

It is Flanders' fortune to be caught between Bourbonist-Hapsburg rivalry which lasted centuries, and then subsequently getting caught between the French Republic and (a now united) German Reich. England's traditional policy was to maintain an independent low countries as a buffer between those aforementioned powers (and to keep the trade links/sea lanes operating) - this is as true in the wars against The Sun King as it was in the war against the Kaiser. 

- Or should I say misfortune. 

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The Third Reich in Power, 1933 - 1939 by R.J. Evans (reread)

Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600-1947 by C. Clarke

This is a scholarly tome which charts the rise of Brandenburg-Prussia as a disparate gaggle of dynastic territories to the conquering Kingdom under Frederick the Great during the 18th century, from the uniter of a German nation-state under Bismark, to collapse and liquidation at the end of the Second World War. It takes in, besides great wars and battles, state-craft, the enlightenment (Hegel), religion, the Jews and migrants, along the way. 

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1 minute ago, DieselDaisy said:

The Third Reich in Power, 1933 - 1939 by R.J. Evans (reread)

Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600-1947 by C. Clarke

This is a scholarly tome which charts the rise of Brandenburg-Prussia as a disparate gaggle of dynastic territories to the conquering Kingdom under Frederick the Great during the 18th century, from the uniter of a German nation-state under Bismark, to collapse and liquidation at the end of the Second World War. It takes in, besides great wars and battles, state-craft, the enlightenment (Hegel), religion, the Jews and migrants, along the way. 

If you had to quantify how many books you've read on the world wars what do you think the number might end up at?

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28 minutes ago, DieselDaisy said:

I couldn't answer that. A lot - I have quite a few that are keepers and on my bookshelf.

 

The reason I ask is because I struggle to read more than a few books on the same subject, it fascinates me how people can read so much about the one thing.  I suppose the world wars are a lot more broad a topic than the types of shit I've read more than one book on, like The Beatles or The Stones or something.

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8 minutes ago, Len Cnut said:

The reason I ask is because I struggle to read more than a few books on the same subject, it fascinates me how people can read so much about the one thing.  I suppose the world wars are a lot more broad a topic than the types of shit I've read more than one book on, like The Beatles or The Stones or something.

That is true. Under the umbrella ''second world war'' you could have anything, from a book on land girls, to a guide on uniforms of the Wehrmacht. 

I have read probably too much on the Nazis. 

PS 

A good example, a book on women's fashion during the Third Reich,

Image result for Nazi chic book

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When it comes down to WW2 literature I mostly like to read about what happened in my own neck of the woods. I grew up in a town where a lot happened during the war. Last month it was 75 years since it was liberated and another book was published with stories from the locals. It's interesting seeing family names being mentioned and going out to see for myself where something tragic happened and seeing the impacts of the combat on some old buildings that are still around or visiting the monuments that can be found everywhere. It comes a lot closer this way than just reading about what happened far away.

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I am nearing completion of Bill Bryson's new one which I obtained for Christmas present,

9780857522412.jpg

It is a bit of a sequel to his A Short History of Nearly Everything (2005), his first science book, and written in a similar manner by which he has traveled and discussed the science with various experts which he introduces anecdotally (''so and so is a friendly Englishman with a beard'') and quotes breezily - you'll recognise this style from Short History. It is very fascinating - I never knew chemotherapy is essentially Mustard Gas, the same stuff used in the trenches in World War One? - however a bit morbid and depressing; Bryson seemingly has been rummaging around a dissected corpse during his research! America gets a bit of a pasting (death rate nearly double rest of first world yet Americans spend 2 1/2 times more per capita average than other first world countries!) as does general human stupidity. Conclusion: we are all going to die in painful humiliating ways through dodgy genes, crippling infections, cancer, poor diets and organ failure. Not exactly festive reading - this has been what I have been reading over Christmas haha. 

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Question for all you bookworms out there:

I'm an avid reader myself; I can read just about anything and everything. With that being said, how do you all decide on which book to read next? If I go into a library/bookstore, I think to myself, "If I had the time and money, I'd read everything available in here." But of course it simply doesn't work that way. So how do you all go about deciding which specific book you're going to read next? 

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