Jump to content

Photoshop - What version do you use?


Budweiser

Recommended Posts

What version do you use? I have a some experience with pirated versions of it before - So while I'm not a novice, I certainly don't think im anything close to an expert. Would Elements 8 be the version I should look for?

What's the difference between the Elements package and the crazy expensive CS4?

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use PS CS3.

This might be useful reading;

Photoshop Elements

Photoshop Elements is an adaptation of Photoshop meant to address and attract the croud of users who would otherwise be looking to Paint Shop Pro (or other less expensive program) because of the strong feature set and attractive price. While removing some of the access to higher-end features, Elements (as per the name) retains the core functions of Photoshop, and goes one step further to attempt to simplify the interface. The result is a powerful package with core abilities that rival its sister program Photoshop. Note that I suggest it is a 'sister', rather than a 'simplified', 'dumbed down' or 'limited' version as I often see it referred to.

Elements is not really made to be a program that is subservient to Photoshop: it is intended to be a different product entirely that focuses on digital photography and basically an RGB workflow. Adobe chose to hide some of the features in the interface (e.g., Curves, Channel Mixer, Color Balance, CMYK, channels, calculations and running actions, all of which are all possible using work-arounds from my book). This can either be seen as an attempt by Adobe to distance the product from Photoshop, or, and it seems more correctly, as a means of keeping the interface easier and more manangeable.

The program has an easier structure than Photoshop and is more friendly to new users because there are fewer tools on the surface, but translating that to somehow inferior is incorrect. The guts of the program are the same as Photoshop, and the user can enhance the interface along with their growth as a user. It serves both the purpose of an introductory package, and in some cases, potential as a professional one. Certainly it can work as a partner with Photoshop to behave as a less expensive second license: just build actions you need in Photoshop and install them in Elements to create solutions to production needs.

NOTE: As for tools it is said to be missing from Elements, most all of these can be devised using the right techniques. For example, I've released a healing tool for Elements users, and can easily create an extract tool using existing functionality. It is all a matter of employing core tools to define technique.

http://www.graphic-design.com/Photoshop/lynch/elements.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use PS CS3.

This might be useful reading;

Photoshop Elements

Photoshop Elements is an adaptation of Photoshop meant to address and attract the croud of users who would otherwise be looking to Paint Shop Pro (or other less expensive program) because of the strong feature set and attractive price. While removing some of the access to higher-end features, Elements (as per the name) retains the core functions of Photoshop, and goes one step further to attempt to simplify the interface. The result is a powerful package with core abilities that rival its sister program Photoshop. Note that I suggest it is a 'sister', rather than a 'simplified', 'dumbed down' or 'limited' version as I often see it referred to.

Elements is not really made to be a program that is subservient to Photoshop: it is intended to be a different product entirely that focuses on digital photography and basically an RGB workflow. Adobe chose to hide some of the features in the interface (e.g., Curves, Channel Mixer, Color Balance, CMYK, channels, calculations and running actions, all of which are all possible using work-arounds from my book). This can either be seen as an attempt by Adobe to distance the product from Photoshop, or, and it seems more correctly, as a means of keeping the interface easier and more manangeable.

The program has an easier structure than Photoshop and is more friendly to new users because there are fewer tools on the surface, but translating that to somehow inferior is incorrect. The guts of the program are the same as Photoshop, and the user can enhance the interface along with their growth as a user. It serves both the purpose of an introductory package, and in some cases, potential as a professional one. Certainly it can work as a partner with Photoshop to behave as a less expensive second license: just build actions you need in Photoshop and install them in Elements to create solutions to production needs.

NOTE: As for tools it is said to be missing from Elements, most all of these can be devised using the right techniques. For example, I've released a healing tool for Elements users, and can easily create an extract tool using existing functionality. It is all a matter of employing core tools to define technique.

http://www.graphic-design.com/Photoshop/lynch/elements.html

To you use CS3 for entertainment or for professional purposes? What are some of its capabilities that Element can't do?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To you use CS3 for entertainment or for professional purposes? What are some of its capabilities that Element can't do?

I use CS3 at work & CS2 at home - the difference is minimal. In all honesty, I'm not very qualified to comment as I use Illustrator much more than Photoshop.

From memory - it's been a while since I used elements (and some of these may have been included in later versions);

  • You can't work in CMYK with anything - just RGB (not a huge issue unless you're working on something that is primarily in CYMK)
  • It doesn't remember your previous actions (undo steps...) like PS does
  • Some advanced text functions - like 'Type on a path etc'
  • I don't think you can mask stuff the same

Sorry I'm not much help.

Rick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To you use CS3 for entertainment or for professional purposes? What are some of its capabilities that Element can't do?

I use CS3 at work & CS2 at home - the difference is minimal. In all honesty, I'm not very qualified to comment as I use Illustrator much more than Photoshop.

From memory - it's been a while since I used elements (and some of these may have been included in later versions);

  • You can't work in CMYK with anything - just RGB (not a huge issue unless you're working on something that is primarily in CYMK)
  • It doesn't remember your previous actions (undo steps...) like PS does
  • Some advanced text functions - like 'Type on a path etc'
  • I don't think you can mask stuff the same

Sorry I'm not much help.

Rick.

That's great info. Thanks.

Adobe Master collection CS4

You're no help! :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless you're a professional, it's unlikely you'll have a need to purchase a full, paid version of CS4. I'd honestly just go with elements (I've used both and have never not been able to do something in elements that I could do in CS4).

If you're worried, you can download 30 day trials of both from the Adobe website - familiarise yourself with them and then make your decision. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...