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2 hours ago, SoulMonster said:

What is "remainism"? 

Malady prevalent in 48% of denizens of the United Kingdom. Latin name, wanker waitrosus. Usually affects the cognitive functions and objective reasoning.  Here is another sufferer,

 

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8 half naked men in a hot tub. Seems pretty Greek to me.

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2 minutes ago, DieselDaisy said:

Malady prevalent in 48% of denizens of the United Kingdom. Latin name, wanker waitrosus. Usually affects the cognitive functions and objective reasoning.  Here is another sufferer,

Very funny to categorize everybody who disagrees with you on the EU as having a disease! Haha. Great ongoing joke there, Diesel!

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Just now, SoulMonster said:

Very funny to categorize everybody who disagrees with you on the EU as having a disease! Haha. Great ongoing joke there, Diesel!

Some experts believe there is a connection between Remainism and the disease known as TDD (Trump Derangement Disorder), both sharing similar symptoms.

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1 hour ago, SoulMonster said:

Heh, even Norwegian newspapers are starting to write about Starmer and the great work he is doing to rally the party.

It really is astonishing how much difference simply reading your brief makes. Starmer is an ex barrister and former Director of Public Prosecutions which is basically the worst nightmare for somebody like Boris who pays so little attention to general detail. He could get away with it beforehand because Corbyn was similarly clueless but now he doesn't know what do do. 

Eg-dZOrXgAEIRoy?format=jpg&name=large

Edited by Dazey
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1 hour ago, DieselDaisy said:

Some experts believe there is a connection between Remainism and the disease known as TDD (Trump Derangement Disorder), both sharing similar symptoms.

Yeah, but people who are experts at remembering historical dates aren't usually good at much else, I hear, and I suppose that includes diagnosing people who happen to just disagree with them or repairing tables or fixing stuff.

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Starmer has as much chance at winning the next election as Ed Davey. Boris and his cabinet have made an utter balls-up of a pandemic (permeating into education and other portfolios), illegal migrants and numerous other things, and I wouldn't bet against Boris increasing his majority next time round. 

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1 minute ago, DieselDaisy said:

Starmer has as much chance at winning the next election as Ed Davey. Boris and his cabinet have made an utter balls-up of a pandemic (permeating into education and other portfolios), illegal migrants and numerous other things, and I wouldn't bet against Boris increasing his majority next time round. 

I don't think that Starmer anticipates winning the next election but I think he can make enough of a dent in the Tory majority for another go after that. I just think it's refreshing to see a grown-up in the room making Johnson look like a, well, Johnson quite frankly. :lol: 

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Just now, Dazey said:

I don't think that Starmer anticipates winning the next election but I think he can make enough of a dent in the Tory majority for another go after that. I just think it's refreshing to see a grown-up in the room making Johnson look like a, well, Johnson quite frankly. :lol: 

All the Tories need to do to win the next election is post this photo in every working class letter box,

skynews-keir-starmer-angela-rayner_50096

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2 minutes ago, Dazey said:

I don't think that Starmer anticipates winning the next election but I think he can make enough of a dent in the Tory majority for another go after that. I just think it's refreshing to see a grown-up in the room making Johnson look like a, well, Johnson quite frankly. :lol: 

There's no bigger Johnson in the room when Johnsons about, I must say.

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Just now, DieselDaisy said:

All the Tories need to do to win the next election is post this photo in every working class letter box,

skynews-keir-starmer-angela-rayner_50096

I'm sure that some of the Gammon vote can be siphoned off once everybody starts losing their jobs in a couple of months compounded by the impact of a no deal Brexit in January.

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1 minute ago, Dazey said:

I'm sure that some of the Gammon vote can be siphoned off once everybody starts losing their jobs in a couple of months compounded by the impact of a no deal Brexit in January.

Weren't you drooling over Rishi and the prospect of a Rishi ministry the other day? You said you would vote for him. I hate to tell you this but Rishi is just as much a Brexiteer as Boris. 

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8 minutes ago, DieselDaisy said:

Weren't you drooling over Rishi and the prospect of a Rishi ministry the other day? You said you would vote for him. I hate to tell you this but Rishi is just as much a Brexiteer as Boris. 

Yeah but I imagine that he would have been able to answer a simple question at the dispatch box without pooing himself. At this point Brexit is over, it's a done deal and we're not going back so Brexiter credentials are a moot point.

It's whether the person in question is competent to take charge going forward and I would be much happier to see Sunak in post now rather than Boris simply because he's not a buffoon.

I get that it's a low bar but that's just where we are right now. Similarly Starmer is clearly the more intelligent and competent of the two when compared to Boris so I would also be happy to vote for him in the General.

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Just now, Dazey said:

Yeah but I imagine that he would have been able to answer a simple question at the dispatch box without pooing himself. At this point Brexit is over, it's a done deal and we're not going back so Brexiter credentials are a moot point.

It's whether the person in question is competent to take charge going forward and I would be much happier to see Sunak in post now rather than Boris simply because he's not a buffoon.

I get that it's a low bar but that's just where we are right now. Similarly Starmer is clearly the more intelligent and competent of the two when compared to Boris so I would also be happy to vote for him in the General.

I think most people would prefer Sunak - me included - but there is a storm brewing there, namely tax hikes. Sunak wants tax hikes apparently to pay for the kung flu crisis. 

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14 minutes ago, Dazey said:

I'm sure that some of the Gammon vote can be siphoned off once everybody starts losing their jobs in a couple of months compounded by the impact of a no deal Brexit in January.

Can't they just fish, coop a barrel, work at a telephone central or sweep a chimney or something? Join the army and colonize some "three bob country"?

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4 minutes ago, DieselDaisy said:

I think most people would prefer Sunak - me included - but there is a storm brewing there, namely tax hikes. Sunak wants tax hikes apparently to pay for the kung flu crisis. 

Which is where Johnson may be of use given that he's reportedly ruled out any form of return to austerity to dig our way out of this hole. That said, if he's very definitely ruled it out that should mean it will be official government policy by lunchtime on Monday.

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So Boris is pushing a no deal Brexit in order to escape from EU rules on state aid to UK companies. I'm sure he knows that he already agreed to be bound by these rules in the withdrawal agreement he signed in January. I mean I'm sure he's read the whole thing in detail right? Right?

Oh well, at least we'll have the fish eh? :lol: 

Quote

No-Deal Brexit Over State Aid Would Be a UK Own Goal

If the Brexit negotiations end with no trade deal and a cliff-edge for businesses at the end of this year, it will be because of disagreements over a seemingly niche but vitally important issue: state aid.

When David Frost, UK chief negotiator, last time met with his EU counterpart, Michel Barnier, in Brussels, he indicated to his colleague that he will recommend that Britain leaves without a trade deal unless the EU drops demands the UK continue to align with EU state aid rules. Yet, for all the bravado on display in the Berlaymont, the UK government should think twice before it decides to take this irreversible step. Not only would this risk a trade deal with the EU, but it would also come back to bite Britain back twice as hard – because last year’s Northern Ireland deal provides backdoor for EU state aid rules into the UK.

A free-for-all on state aid is not possible because of Northern Ireland

The UK prime minister has said to the EU that he wants to avoid any curbs by future EU rules on Britain’s ability to subsidise domestic businesses. Nor does he want Britain to be under any international obligation that would limit what Britain can do to support businesses as a sovereign nation. Downing Street says that it is a matter of principle, not something for discussion.

Yet, however much the UK government wants to avoid curbs on its ability to subside businesses in the trade deal with the EU, it is a mistake to think that Britain can have complete freedom from EU state aid rules in future. The legal reality is that the withdrawal treaty that took the UK out of the EU in January makes that impossible.

When Boris Johnson made his grand bargain with the EU last autumn, he secured Northern Ireland’s special status in the EU single market for goods, allowing Northern Ireland to maintain frictionless trade with the bloc of the 27 countries in the future while avoiding a new border on the island of Ireland. The quid-pro-quo was that Northern Ireland would continue to abide by a suite of EU laws even though the UK will have no influence over them. Buried in the text is also the commitment that binds the UK as a whole to EU state aid rules where any future subsidies “affect trade” in goods between Northern Ireland and the EU.

However, this commitment is so broad that the EU’s state aid rules will apply not just to Northern Irish firms, but also to the rest of the UK. The withdrawal treaty sets only one condition on what subsidies fall under these rules – they must have “effect on trade” between NI and the EU. This is a very low bar, meaning a wide range of state aid will likely be caught by the rules. In practice, for example, if the government awarded a subsidy to Nissan, a GB-based car manufacturer, this would very likely fall under the rules, just as would a UK-wide furlough scheme of recent months.

More generally, there are at least four different ways in which this might happen:

  1. If the UK government gives subsidy to a company based in Great Britain with a subsidiary in Northern Ireland (because extra funds could give a NI subsidiary an advantage over EU companies competing in NI);
  2. Subsidy to a company in GB producing goods which are exported to NI (such as cars assembled in GB, because cheaper goods could unfairly displace EU imports into NI);
  3. Subsidy for a service provided by a company in GB which leads to a lower price of a good in NI (such as government subsidy to a GB bank with a NI client);
  4. UK-wide subsidy benefiting to NI companies and/or consumers (such as a tax benefit for energy consumers).

Furthermore, if future subsidies were deemed to distort trade with the EU, Brussels could launch investigations, ask the government to recover the subsidy from its beneficiary, and even take the UK to the European Court of Justice. And, if the ministers felt compelled to ignore the rules, the withdrawal treaty states that the EU could retaliate against Britain in any area of the withdrawal settlement, or indeed any future treaties between the UK and the EU. If this reads like speculative dystopia, read Articles 10, 11 and 12 of the Northern Ireland protocol – one of the small number of provisions which the Johnson government renegotiated last autumn.

A UK-wide state-aid regime can save the government from its own trap

If this is the backdrop for the current negotiation, threatening to walk away with no trade deal over state aid is both naive and irresponsible. It is naive because Downing Street dismisses the legal reality of the withdrawal treaty in the hope of securing an unattainable goal of full control of the post-Brexit state-aid policy. It is downright irresponsible because the government, aware of the risk that would impose both a significant economic cost of no-deal and an extraterritorial limit on its ability to subsidise its businesses, actively chooses to consider this option.

The prime minister’s advisers might hope to convince Brussels to amend the withdrawal treaty in order to mitigate these risks. But expecting Brussels to drop the stick over state aid while the UK is threatening to walk away from the trade talks over the same issue is bound to fail.

The UK’s best hope – if it wants to avoid the damaging consequences of its own choices from last year – is to establish a robust subsidy control regime at home. There is a strong case for this from a domestic perspective anyway, not least to protect taxpayers’ money from being wasted on ministerial pet projects and to prevent a race to the bottom on subsidies among UK regions. Such a regime, if independently regulated, would give the EU assurance that the post-Brexit state-aid policy will not damage the bloc’s single market from the outside.

If this is a hard reality to accept, it is because it is hard to understand how Mr Johnson agreed to such a constraint on the UK’s sovereignty in the withdrawal treaty whilst boasting about having ended the years of “vassalage” by Brussels. Yet the prime minister needs to acknowledge this reality. There won’t be a deal until the UK engages with the EU’s concerns more constructively and shows that the government will develop credible state aid rules at home. Nor can the UK walk away with no-deal without risking that the EU will, in future, use every opportunity it has – including through the Northern Ireland protocol – to fine the UK over harmful subsidies and even to take the government to the European Court of Justice.

A failure to acknowledge this reality would lead the UK prime minister to his biggest own goal on Brexit yet: a disruptive and irresponsible no-deal and an immense extraterritorial constraint on the UK’s post-Brexit state-aid policy. This would be not just a failure of statecraft, but amateurism on the part of the prime minister and his advisers. Yet it is a glimpse into Boris Johnson’s future outside the single market – and with no trade deal with the EU.

https://institute.global/policy/no-deal-brexit-over-state-aid-would-be-uk-own-goal

Edited by Dazey
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21 minutes ago, DieselDaisy said:

Why has remainism suddenly bubbled-up again? My only theory is you all momentarily got sidetracked by supporting BLM, but now you're back to your default setting? Rather like a gizmo that has been reset I suppose.

Who are you talking to? Are you confusing twitter with mygnrforum again? 

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1 hour ago, SoulMonster said:

Who are you talking to? Are you confusing twitter with mygnrforum again? 

Perhaps he’s just making a socio-cultural observation?  I wish we’d’ve all gone to school together, I’d shit-stirred a fight between yous two double quick :lol: 

Edited by Len Cnut
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8 minutes ago, Len Cnut said:

Perhaps he’s just making a socio-cultural observation?  I wish we’d’ve all gone to school together, I’d shit-stirred a fight between yous two double quick :lol: 

Every time there was a fight at my school everyone would go... JERRY! JERRY! JERRY!, which was so fucking stupid... keep in mind, this was the 90's when The Jerry Springer Show was popular.

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36 minutes ago, SoulMonster said:

Except that he was saying "you all" indicating he was talking to someone here, or again were just confused as to what social media he was actually on.

Surely that makes it even clearer who he’s talking to, remainers.  Or talking about.

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30 minutes ago, SoulMonster said:

But who here is he talking to? My theory is that he was drunk, read something on twitter that offended him, and replied here.

Well, it refers to a group, doesn’t it?  Like me, in a review of Appetite going, ‘all yous who rate Chi Dem over this want your heads lookin’ at’.  And yeah, I’ve come across a few round here.

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