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Unpopular Opinion: UYI Production Made GNR Biggest Band in the World


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11 minutes ago, soon said:

I think there is a lot of truth to this^^^

What Ive heard from some people who were fans at the time of release is that the albums were so anticipated that theyd be huge anyways. And that the production and presence of slow ballads actually lost them a not-insignificant part of their already rabid fan base.

I think that the over production is real. But to your point, I think that the trilogy and KOHD benefited from the over production. However I also think that the entire rest of the 2 albums suffers from it. Ive heard NR on one of the soothing office music playlists/radio things at the dentist and the sonics fit right in with all that stuff. So mission accomplished, but its as if the entire album was produced around getting NR, DC and KOHD onto mainstream radio. Fuck me, RNDTH and PC are gutted by all that high end sheen.

I think one could argue that a hit ballad in the vein of SCOM would have suffered far less backlash then NR and DC in the grunge era. And I suppose that Fall to Pieces in a way demonstrated that years later. 

So, yes NR made them huge and its production is as it should be, but imho the overall production style both neutered the rest of the tracks and made GNR seem passe soon after.

I hear what you’re saying and pretty much agree.  Would it have made for an inconsistent album if the trilogy and KOHD were produced as they were, but then produce and mix the rockers with a more AFD sound?

Wonder how that would have affected the overall sound of the albums.  Has any band ever produced songs differently on the same album before?

Hell, I don’t know if it’s the production or what, but in terms of consistency ChiDem sounds so inconsistent.  Twat, IRS, Catcher all sound incredibly dated, yet you have songs like Better, Shackler’s, and Sorry that all sound much more modern.  As we now know, all of those songs were written in the same era yet they sound like they were from completely different eras on the final album!

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Right now I'm listening to the Hell Revisited tracks (for those who don't know, basically just a bunch of demos) and it occurred to me that the production on the UYI albums helped propel GNR into one

I personally never really felt the illusions were OVERproduced. I felt they were nicely produced. Yes, a lot of songs were bloated, bombastic, and had a lot going on, but I never felt anything was out

41 minutes ago, soon said:

I think there is a lot of truth to this^^^

What Ive heard from some people who were fans at the time of release is that the albums were so anticipated that theyd be huge anyways. And that the production and presence of slow ballads actually lost them a not-insignificant part of their already rabid fan base.

I think that the over production is real. But to your point, I think that the trilogy and KOHD benefited from the over production. However I also think that the entire rest of the 2 albums suffers from it. Ive heard NR on one of the soothing office music playlists/radio things at the dentist and the sonics fit right in with all that stuff. So mission accomplished, but its as if the entire album was produced around getting NR, DC and KOHD onto mainstream radio. Fuck me, RNDTH and PC are gutted by all that high end sheen.

I think one could argue that a hit ballad in the vein of SCOM would have suffered far less backlash then NR and DC in the grunge era. And I suppose that Fall to Pieces in a way demonstrated that years later. 

So, yes NR made them huge and its production is as it should be, but imho the overall production style both neutered the rest of the tracks and made GNR seem passe soon after.

When I listen to the rockers I don't hear a band that is neutering itself, I mean...Right Next Door to Hell, Perfect Crime, Don't Damn Me or an epic rocker like Coma...that doesn't sound like a band neutering itself. I pay no attention to what grunge reactionaries think.

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I read an article at one point, that focused on the build up to the "Use Your Illusion" releases. It basically stated that the anticipation was so high, the next GnR album was expected to challenge Michael Jackson's Thriller in terms of US sales...But, this was prior to finding out that this would be a Double Album release, and the article focused on the album being a single studio album, which was what everyone thought they were getting at that period in time. All in all, last time I checked the albums combined had sold around 14-15 Million US copies. That's still not bad at all! 

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20 minutes ago, papashaun said:

I read an article at one point, that focused on the build up to the "Use Your Illusion" releases. It basically stated that the anticipation was so high, the next GnR album was expected to challenge Michael Jackson's Thriller in terms of US sales...But, this was prior to finding out that this would be a Double Album release, and the article focused on the album being a single studio album, which was what everyone thought they were getting at that period in time. All in all, last time I checked the albums combined had sold around 14-15 Million US copies. That's still not bad at all! 

Isn't it actually higher? Sometimes the RIAA takes forever to update record sales, it seems like the UYI's are being sold short by a few million.

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1 hour ago, dogman said:

I hear what you’re saying and pretty much agree.  Would it have made for an inconsistent album if the trilogy and KOHD were produced as they were, but then produce and mix the rockers with a more AFD sound?

Wonder how that would have affected the overall sound of the albums.  Has any band ever produced songs differently on the same album before?

Hell, I don’t know if it’s the production or what, but in terms of consistency ChiDem sounds so inconsistent.  Twat, IRS, Catcher all sound incredibly dated, yet you have songs like Better, Shackler’s, and Sorry that all sound much more modern.  As we now know, all of those songs were written in the same era yet they sound like they were from completely different eras on the final album!

Yeah, totally. They needed to produce the albums in a consistent way. And in my theory they chose to favour the epic ballads for the most part. 

Thats something that preoccupies my thoughts about any possible new release, too. If theres CD leftovers they are currently produced in a very big, layered, modern, epic way that we've not really heard from Slash and Duff - So could they do an album of CD plus new compositions? Would new tracks need to be produced CD style to sound like a consistent album?

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18 hours ago, dogman said:

This may be true on a music level.  But in terms of popularity and grabbing the attention of the mass public, certainly not.  I don't think there's any arguing the success NR, DC, KOHD, YCBM had when they were released.  If it wasn't for the production, I don't think these songs become as popular as they did.

UYI are weird.. The production is great on some songs and sucks on others... The songs you mentioned all came out great aside from KOHD.. That version is pure garbage.. Almost as bad as the NITL version...

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19 minutes ago, ksks12 said:

A matter of music taste. Imho overproduced ( at least so called rockers), a filler or two too many (shotgun blues, get in the ring), and most of all the thing that really annoyed me was low volume of Izzys guitar.

I love Shotgun Blues and Get In The Ring!!!! I think the volume of Izzy's guitar had a negative impact on some of teh rockers and do make them sound "neutered" to a certain extent.. If all the rockers were all mixed like YCBM it would have sounded much better. 

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19 hours ago, El Nono Pololo said:

To be fair, if they hadn't spent so long tinkering with those songs in the studio, UYI could've been released in 1990 instead of a few days shy of Nirvana's Nevermind changing the music scene for the rest of the decade and signaling the end of the hair-metal scene. Better timing would've made both albums sale even more copies and have an even bigger impact. But that's just my 2 cents...

The narrative that Nevermind changed the musical landscape forever is fake news. GNR continued to be the biggest rock band in the world. They were all over MTV in 1992. They had a huge midnight release of the Illusions records in 1991. And they were huge up until they finished their Illusions touring in 1993, put out a covers record and disappeared. Their disappearance had nothing to do with Nirvana. Nirvana never even headlined a large-scale tour. 

GNR were the band that killed hair metal because they transcended that Sunset Strip genre. Grunge scene was bubbling under the surface for years prior to Nirvana became the media's ambassador's for it. And really, what changed post-Nirvana? Grunge lasted for a couple years, gave way to alternative then rap/rock. 

Guns N' Roses was never more popular than they were during the Use Your Illusions tour. Which is wild to think about, because it means more people were exposed to GNR without Izzy than with Izzy.

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3 minutes ago, GnR Chris said:

The narrative that Nevermind changed the musical landscape forever is fake news. GNR continued to be the biggest rock band in the world. They were all over MTV in 1992. They had a huge midnight release of the Illusions records in 1991. And they were huge up until they finished their Illusions touring in 1993, put out a covers record and disappeared. Their disappearance had nothing to do with Nirvana. Nirvana never even headlined their own tour. 

GNR were the band that killed hair metal, not the last remnants of hair metal. Grunge scene was bubbling under the surface for years prior to Nirvana became the media's ambassador's for it. And really, what changed post-Nirvana? Grunge lasted for a couple years, gave way to alternative then rap/rock. 

What did you mean by this?

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49 minutes ago, Tom-Ass said:

aside from KOHD.. That version is pure garbage.. 

What is it with KOHD.... first the album version with the phone call, then the UYI reggae, followed by the interminable NITL version...

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47 minutes ago, GnR Chris said:

The narrative that Nevermind changed the musical landscape forever is fake news. GNR continued to be the biggest rock band in the world. They were all over MTV in 1992. They had a huge midnight release of the Illusions records in 1991. And they were huge up until they finished their Illusions touring in 1993, put out a covers record and disappeared. Their disappearance had nothing to do with Nirvana. Nirvana never even headlined a large-scale tour. 

GNR were the band that killed hair metal because they transcended that Sunset Strip genre. Grunge scene was bubbling under the surface for years prior to Nirvana became the media's ambassador's for it. And really, what changed post-Nirvana? Grunge lasted for a couple years, gave way to alternative then rap/rock. 

Guns N' Roses was never more popular than they were during the Use Your Illusions tour. Which is wild to think about, because it means more people were exposed to GNR without Izzy than with Izzy.

When Cobain passed away, I thought at the time and still think that MTV rewrote history regarding that band. I distinctly remember it was Pearl Jam that broke through before Nirvana. Due to the fact that Cobain was the first singer to pass away from the grunge scene, MTV made him more than he actually was. 

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18 minutes ago, Ant said:

What is it with KOHD.... first the album version with the phone call, then the UYI reggae, followed by the interminable NITL version...

I actually like the Days of Thunder version for KOHD. Axl added a few more lyric to it. 

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2 hours ago, Draguns said:

When Cobain passed away, I thought at the time and still think that MTV rewrote history regarding that band. I distinctly remember it was Pearl Jam that broke through before Nirvana. Due to the fact that Cobain was the first singer to pass away from the grunge scene, MTV made him more than he actually was. 

It was Nirvana that broke first then Pearl Jam took the lead around 1993-4 then Kurt killed himself and it was back to Nirvana

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25 minutes ago, Nicklord said:

It was Nirvana that broke first then Pearl Jam took the lead around 1993-4 then Kurt killed himself and it was back to Nirvana

I do remember the radio stations in NYC playing Pearl Jam before Nirvana. I also remember watching Evenflow on MTV before Smells Like Teen Spirit. 

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4 hours ago, Tom-Ass said:

This

 Think they were still popular because lies record was still getting airplay and patience single and video was still getting high rotation on music channels.

35 minutes ago, Draguns said:

I do remember the radio stations in NYC playing Pearl Jam before Nirvana. I also remember watching Evenflow on MTV before Smells Like Teen Spirit. 

This. I remember seeing the video for even flow first before smells like......

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UYI were PERFECT for their time. They both have something for everybody. Lots of misses, but band was at its creative peak. The tour kicked ass too. They were the biggest band in the world pre Nirvana for sure.

1 hour ago, Draguns said:

I do remember the radio stations in NYC playing Pearl Jam before Nirvana. I also remember watching Evenflow on MTV before Smells Like Teen Spirit. 

Yeah. STP were huge back then too. Really hard to overstate how big that band was at the time.

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5 hours ago, Ant said:

What is it with KOHD.... first the album version with the phone call, then the UYI reggae, followed by the interminable NITL version...

I don't mind the reggae one.. It started out with Izzy just playing a little reggae rhythm at first but then slowly got a little corny.. I still like it though.. That Chicago 92 version rips..  At Least I remember Slash ripping..

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