Jump to content

themadcaplaughs

Members
  • Content Count

    834
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

themadcaplaughs last won the day on August 31 2020

themadcaplaughs had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

306 Excellent

About themadcaplaughs

  • Rank
    Senior

Profile Fields

  • Sex
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. DJ Ashba is nota bad guitarist, and actually seems to be a fairly successful songwriter (although I am not a fan of much of his material). He just wasn't a good fit the role of lead guitarist in Guns N' Roses image-wise or skill wise. I always said that had he been in a role more similar to Richard Fortus - mainly playing rhythm with a few big solos scattered throughout the set that played his his strengths as a guitarist- the die hard fans probably would have liked him a lot more. He just did not have the dexterity as a guitarist to handle all the different types of guitar styles the role ent
  2. He clarified on a later YouTube interview that nothing was set in stone regarding Slash and Duff when he left, but that the rumors were already starting to spread among the other band members and the road crew that it was the next step. From what we've been told by moderators on this forum, Axl and management at least briefly pursued the idea of "CD II" coming out in 2016/2017 and that Axl was taking stock of what songs were ready and which needed more work; which was also corroborated by those tweets of Christ Pittman hanging out with Axl in the studio in 2015. Pittman had also mentioned
  3. Some dude named Michael Lee Firkins auditioned at some point. You can read the thread about it from way back. Tl;dr version: Axl passed because Firkins used his whammy bar too much. Also, Tommy looks particularly rough in that video.
  4. I think there was some overlap between Dough and Merck. From one of Goldstein's interviews a few years back, I think he said he still managed day to day dealings with Axl as a manager, and was around at least until the 2002 VMAs. I imagine he was dumped shortly after that. I also know Peter Katsis managed the band for a minute (like one or two months) at some point between 2010 and 2011. I want to say after Doc and before Team Brazil, but I could be wrong on the timing, but I'm pretty sure Katsis' team set up the interview with That Metal Show in 2011.
  5. On the first album: generic songwriting and an even more generic singer (when a more unique or energetic singer could have brought some of those songs to life) combined with the fact that, per Slash's book, the label essentially viewed the album as a way to let Slash blow off steam before he went to record the next Guns N' Roses record. As other have pointed out, I think there were also issues with record label on the second era of Snakepit, but the overwhelming feeling was that it just wasn't what people were listening to in terms of rock music at the beginning of the 2000s. Even when G
  6. That Tommy Stinson and Del James relentlessly picked on Buckethead and did not like him. Also, Robin apparently was not keen on Buckethead being in the band (although they were apparently cordial enough to each other). Ultimately, Buckethead was not a good fit for a "big band" like Guns N' Roses. He likes to do things his own way and be in control of all elements (Brain has mentioned this a few times). If anything, I think it's lucky we got as much recorded output from him as we did. Ron said that he believes part of the reason he started off on the wrong foot with GN'R was because he in
  7. Like a lot of people, it was the House of Blues 2001 show for years, and then that got crossed off the list. Honestly, at this point, I would settle for a professionally shot show anytime from 1988-2010 to get released in some capacity. Obviously, it would be amazing if we got one of the "historic" long shows, but anything would be cool.
  8. 2001/2002 Axl remains fascinating to watch. He has that old Axl "fuck you" fire, but at the same time you can tell he feels very insecure about his legacy and the acceptance of the new band. As other pointed out, GN'R was written off as something as a flash in the pan at that point in time. Duff, Slash, Matt, and Steven all kept relatively low profiles and their popular songs from Appetite for Destruction and the Use Your Illusion albums had not quite reached the "classic rock" status they hold today. The little we did hear about Axl was what a dictator he was and how he threw the band's legac
  9. In regards to the timeline to the reunion, this is how I've always seen it played out (from various interview, forums, etc). -Big thaw in 2014 when Slash gave reasonable demands in regards to the Appetite for Democracy concert movie. Apparently this was when the "thaw" in Axl and Slash's relationship began, and it seemed like there was a future where the two of them could at least move forward in unison on business decisions. My educated guess would be this was where Bumblefoot's statements about reunion rumors starting during his time in the band came from (even if they were more scuttl
  10. A little late on the discussion here, but in regards to the newest video, I can honestly say I have no complaints at all; something I'm not sure has ever occurred with something GN'R related since 2001. They chose a great show with some cool song selections. Obviously, I will continue to whine until we get a new album, but sometimes I do give the band credit to put things in perspective. If, at the height of the DJ Ashba lineup in 2013/2014, someone had told me we'd have free, easily available pro-shots of: (1) Slash playing Chinese Democracy songs, (2) Axl singing a Velvet Revolver song, and
  11. He was the only guitarist I have seen that seemed to get worse as him time in the band progressed. In 2009/2010, there was still a lot of work to do, but it felt like he was on the way to getting where he needed to be (I also cut him some slack because Robin had some pretty rough nights in 2001/2002). That being said, when they came back in 2011, it seemed like his guitar playing took a backseat to his showboating antics. He's not a bad guitarist by any means, but has no "wow" factor that someone like Slash, Robin, or Buckethead did. Honestly, if Richard had gotten to play full lead (lik
  12. I'm all for bands and musicians trying different things, but the song DJ released under the "ASHBA" moniker really shows what he does; just adopts whatever style he thinks will get him the most attention: that shred album he released in the 1990s, mid-2000s bro hard rock with Sixx A.M., attempting to play GN'R material to cash in on nostalgia, or dance music. It does not seem like he particularly identifies with any of them (I would imagine his "truest" style would be closest to Motley Crue).
  13. As the last Guns n' Roses release for about 6 years (and for the general public 14 years), I can understand why someone would see it as a let-down. As a toss off track for a movie soundtrack, it works fine to me. Axl sounds spirited and (unpopular opinion) I actually like the guitar "call and response" between Slash and Paul Tobias. That being said, it's not a track I actively seek out. I only heard/hear it when I used to listen to the Greatest Hits album, or when it pops up on Pandora.
  14. That's what I always found when I talk to people who remember GN'R from the 1990s, but didn't know a whole lot about the band. He appeared in almost all of the Use Your Illusion videos, was in a majority of press and photos from the era, and played on their most well-known professionally released show (the Tokyo shows). I do not pay a whole lot of attention to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but it did seem strange to me that they did not include a member who was in the band during the majority of the band's most famous period. Even going off the "we only induct people who play on records" sta
  15. He was (and still seems) like a genuinely cool dude, and saved the band's ass on a moment's notice after Izzy left the band. In all honesty, I suppose it's entirely possible more people saw the band with Gilby than Izzy. It would have been interesting to see how the guitar chemistry would have evolved had he stayed in the band. Gilby is a much "tighter" guitar player than Izzy when it comes to rhythm and close to Slash's level when it comes to lead (maybe even as good on a technical level. Slash just has such an immediately recognizable tone). Izzy's biggest contribution to the band was s
×
×
  • Create New...