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"What Movie Did You Watch?" - 2019 Edition

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1 hour ago, Oldest Goat said:

Basically I think what @DieselDaisy thinks of it. It's flawless. Everything from the atmosphere to the music and sound to the punchy poetic dialogue is brilliant. I first watched it when I was in a really fucked up suicidal state too and found it inspiring. 

"I. Want. More. LIFE."

 

The opening panorama of dystopian Los Angeles with the spinner and Vangelis's (Glockenspiel or harpsichord?) music is one of my favourite scenes in a film ever - it immediately draws you in - the furnaces belting out plumes of fire, etc. But then there is so many stunning scenes in that film. 

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7 hours ago, DieselDaisy said:

The opening panorama of dystopian Los Angeles with the spinner and Vangelis's (Glockenspiel or harpsichord?) music is one of my favourite scenes in a film ever - it immediately draws you in - the furnaces belting out plumes of fire, etc. But then there is so many stunning scenes in that film. 

That was the bit I remember from Film Studies, I must've watched that bit 40 fuckin' times.  Perhaps it didn't benefit from the academic dissecting of it before I'd even seen it properly.  I get all the things you said but like...it seemed like those themes, the most interesting aspects of it, were only hinted at, just like short bits of dialogue etc or thematic  things that, if you think about them, its there.  The film itself, the nuts and bolts of it, in a Hitchcockian sense, there's not a lot to it, other than just looking great, in the way Terminator looked great (but Terminator, plot-wise, structure-wise, the whole flow of it was also really entertaining). 

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1 hour ago, Len Cnut said:

That was the bit I remember from Film Studies, I must've watched that bit 40 fuckin' times.  Perhaps it didn't benefit from the academic dissecting of it before I'd even seen it properly.  I get all the things you said but like...it seemed like those themes, the most interesting aspects of it, were only hinted at, just like short bits of dialogue etc or thematic  things that, if you think about them, its there.  The film itself, the nuts and bolts of it, in a Hitchcockian sense, there's not a lot to it, other than just looking great, in the way Terminator looked great (but Terminator, plot-wise, structure-wise, the whole flow of it was also really entertaining). 

You know that bit was based on Middlesbrough right? :lol: I'm not even joking either. It's based on the site where I used to work.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Dazey said:

You know that bit was based on Middlesbrough right? :lol: I'm not even joking either. It's based on the site where I used to work.

Fuck off :lol:  Based on Middlesborough :lol:

EDIT:

Well blow me down, its fuckin' true and all!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/tees/content/articles/2009/03/30/tees_tf_blade_runner_feature.shtml

 

Edited by Len Cnut

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2 hours ago, Len Cnut said:

That was the bit I remember from Film Studies, I must've watched that bit 40 fuckin' times.  Perhaps it didn't benefit from the academic dissecting of it before I'd even seen it properly.  I get all the things you said but like...it seemed like those themes, the most interesting aspects of it, were only hinted at, just like short bits of dialogue etc or thematic  things that, if you think about them, its there.  The film itself, the nuts and bolts of it, in a Hitchcockian sense, there's not a lot to it, other than just looking great, in the way Terminator looked great (but Terminator, plot-wise, structure-wise, the whole flow of it was also really entertaining). 

They do that to Shakespeare and Dickens in school and it sucks all of the life out of them I feel.

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You'll fucking kill me, but I love Blade Runner 2049 more. Both are masterpieces, but the Villeneuve one was (and still is) for me like a fist between the eyes. I've already seen this movie at least 10 times.

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12 minutes ago, Drexl said:

You'll fucking kill me, but I love Blade Runner 2049 more. Both are masterpieces, but the Villeneuve one was (and still is) for me like a fist between the eyes. I've already seen this movie at least 10 times.

Original=10/10

2049=6.5/10

It's all style no substance and rests too heavily on the laurels of the original. It should have been braver. I was rooting for it and gave it a fair chance.

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2 minutes ago, Oldest Goat said:

Original=10/10

2049=6.5/10

It's all style no substance and rests too heavily on the laurels of the original. It should have been braver. I was rooting for it and gave it a fair chance.

I'd place 2049 at about 8-9. 

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2 hours ago, Oldest Goat said:

Original=10/10

2049=6.5/10

It's all style no substance and rests too heavily on the laurels of the original. It should have been braver. I was rooting for it and gave it a fair chance.

Yeah? Well... You know, that's just like a... your opinion, man. ;)

Nevermind, here's one of the forgotten masterpieces.

 

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Rider on the Rain (1970) - Charles Bronson, Jill Ireland

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4 hours ago, Len Cnut said:

Rider on the Rain (1970) - Charles Bronson, Jill Ireland

I wasn't familiar with this one so I checked it out on IMDb.  Each scene was actually filmed twice, one take in English and one in French.  Pretty interesting.  

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, lame ass security said:

I wasn't familiar with this one so I checked it out on IMDb.  Each scene was actually filmed twice, one take in English and one in French.  Pretty interesting.  

It was this along with the movie Farewell Friend with Alain Delon that made him a star in Europe, which in turn made America kinda take notice of his leading man potential, before he was kinda like the acting equivalent of the super sub in football, shining amazingly but almost always in supporting roles since the 50s.

Edited by Len Cnut

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45 minutes ago, Len Cnut said:

It was this along with the movie Farewell Friend with Alain Delon that made him a star in Europe, which in turn made America kinda take notice of his leading man potential, before he was kinda like the acting equivalent of the super sub in football, shining amazingly but almost always in supporting roles since the 50s.

That's true, and he was almost 50 years old by this time.  

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Farewell Friend (1968) - Charles Bronson, Alain Delon

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Runaway Train (1985) by Andrei Konchalovsky

Cast: Jon Voight, Eric Roberts, Rebecca De Mornay, Kenneth McMillan, John P. Ryan, Edward Bunker, Kyle T. Heffner, T. K. Carter

Music: Trevor Jones

Cinematography: Alan Hume

 

Marvelous acting, dialogues, music, cinematography and direction. Breathtaking and powerful movie.

 

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If you’re a fan of Pokémon, then you’re 90% likely to enjoy Detective Pikachu.

Recommended for those who may be interested.

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Dolores Claiborne (1995) by Taylor Hackford

Cast: Kathy Bates, Jennifer Jason Leigh, David Strathairn, Judy Parfitt, Christopher Plummer, John C. Reilly, Eric Bogosian, Bob Gunton

Cinematography: Gabriel Beristain

Music: Danny Elfman

 

A simply brilliant movie. Perfect from start to finish. All the actors are outstanding in their performances, the music is beautiful and moving, and about the cinematography... I've never seen a better shot movie. It's pure visual poetry, each still frame is a little masterpiece. Mind-blowing. The whole movie is mind-blowing.

 

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Posted (edited)

The 400 Blows (1959)

Edited by Len Cnut

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On 5/12/2019 at 4:02 AM, Drexl said:

Runaway Train (1985) by Andrei Konchalovsky

Cast: Jon Voight, Eric Roberts, Rebecca De Mornay, Kenneth McMillan, John P. Ryan, Edward Bunker, Kyle T. Heffner, T. K. Carter

Music: Trevor Jones

Cinematography: Alan Hume

 

Marvelous acting, dialogues, music, cinematography and direction. Breathtaking and powerful movie.

 

Totally agree, it's been years since I've seen it but it made a definite impression. 

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Posted (edited)

Romeo is Bleeding (1993) by Peter Medak
Cast: Gary Oldman, Lena Olin, Annabella Sciorra, Juliette Lewis, Roy Scheider, Michael Wincott, Will Patton
Music: Mark Isham
Cinematography: Dariusz Wolski

 

What can I say about this one? This is a movie about lust, sexual lust and lust of money. It's about how easy is to lose clear perception and self-awareness. It's about love, betrayal, fear, greed, hate, then loneliness. It's about how we start appreciating things and people only when we lose them.
It was the second movie with Gary Oldman I've ever seen. The first one was, of course, Leon. And after those two movies, I knew he's the greatest. His diversity, all possible emotions, in facial expression and voice... Jesus, what an artist. You just can't take your eyes off him. And you feel what he feels.
The supporting cast is also wonderful. Everybody's talking about Lena Olin (deservedly), but Annabella Sciorra is criminally overlooked. She's so naturally charming and wise. And like all smart women, she knows much more about her husband, than he could ever have imagined.
Mark Isham's score is a masterpiece on its own. It's like his greatest hits in one, his jazz and electronic sides coexist and intersect here with such ease. One of my all-time favorite albums, not just soundtracks.
Cinematography in this movie is simply beautiful, camera shots and lighting are mesmerizing.
The direction and script are flawless. This movie is a pure feast for the eyes and ears. The problem is most people prefer cheap burgers. Their loss.
Since over 20 years I love this movie more and more every time I watch it and I'm never fed up with it.

 

Edited by Drexl

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Young Man With a Horn (1960) Kirk Douglas, Lauren Bacall, Doris Day

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On 5/10/2019 at 2:06 AM, Drexl said:

Yeah? Well... You know, that's just like a... your opinion, man. ;)

Nevermind, here's one of the forgotten masterpieces.

 

Fuck yes, Strange Days! 

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