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Matt Sorum's Autobiography

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Is Matt a double talking jive for squashing Duff and Slash on his book and then using their names to promote the recently released thing with Cherry Curries???

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16 hours ago, adamwolff11 said:

Wow, that's odd! I did. A couple of my takeaways:

- Matt is pretty full of himself.. there's not much humility and he's not super complimentary of most people he mentions. 

- It's obvious his feelings are still very raw about the reunion and he feels he should have been included. He doesn't really have anything positive to say about it. He was invited to play, but offered no money by Fernando.

- His relationship with Duff seems to be pretty affected by it. He mentions Duff thinks Frank sucks, but Axl wants him. Basically shits on how Duff handled the whole thing. Said Slash referred to it as 'just a gig'. 

- I was most shocked by how he has NOTHING positive to say about Slash. Not even being complimentary of his playing. Basically says his whole go with the flow, easy going stuff is an act and he's more cunning than anyone. Shits on him for stuff related to Guns, Snakepit, and VR. 

- Glossed over the VR stuff for the most part. Weiland may have been mentioned a couple times, but his death was barely acknowledged.

- Acknowledged he immediately regretted his HOF speech, which was probably the most adult emotion he showed in the book. Also used the HOF as an opportunity to shit on Slash.

- Was easily the most complimentary of Axl out of all of Guns members. I felt his takes were pretty fair.. he criticized some of the bullshit, but was also quick to give Axl praise. 

- This was definitely on the Anthony Kiedis book level of 'Then I had sex and then I did drugs and then I had sex, etc, etc'. It's hard to tell throughout a lot of the book whether he's trying to brag or it's just an honest reflection. A part of me thinks he's a dude that still completely glamorizes the 'rockstar lifestyle', but he's relatively thoughtful at the end.

 

All in all, I would recommend it for anyone who likes the band enough to be reading a Guns forum. I'd say 70% of the book involves the period from him joining Guns through the end of VR, which I'd imagine is what most on here would be interested in. And, to me, the fact that this is the first band member's book to be released after the reunion, that was interesting. 

Having read the book, these were my basic takeaways as well. The most surprising thing to me was his treatment of Slash and Duff. I don’t think he says one kind or grateful thing about either guy in this book.

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11 minutes ago, LunsJail said:

Having read the book, these were my basic takeaways as well. The most surprising thing to me was his treatment of Slash and Duff. I don’t think he says one kind or grateful thing about either guy in this book.

Anything about Tori Amos? I've always liked her music.

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3 minutes ago, lame ass security said:

Anything about Tori Amos? I've always liked her music.

Yes, there is a section about her. Basically they were playing together and the record company decided she was the star and she dumps the rest of the band. It doesn’t end on great terms.

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, LunsJail said:

Yes, there is a section about her. Basically they were playing together and the record company decided she was the star and she dumps the rest of the band. It doesn’t end on great terms.

Tori Amos has a book coming out this year. Pretty soon if I remember correcly. It's an autobiography called Resistance.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.newyorker.com/culture/the-new-yorker-interview/tori-amos-believes-the-muses-can-help/amp

Edited by lilacmess
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22 hours ago, adamwolff11 said:

Wow, that's odd! I did. A couple of my takeaways:

- Matt is pretty full of himself.. there's not much humility and he's not super complimentary of most people he mentions. 

- It's obvious his feelings are still very raw about the reunion and he feels he should have been included. He doesn't really have anything positive to say about it. He was invited to play, but offered no money by Fernando.

- His relationship with Duff seems to be pretty affected by it. He mentions Duff thinks Frank sucks, but Axl wants him. Basically shits on how Duff handled the whole thing. Said Slash referred to it as 'just a gig'. 

- I was most shocked by how he has NOTHING positive to say about Slash. Not even being complimentary of his playing. Basically says his whole go with the flow, easy going stuff is an act and he's more cunning than anyone. Shits on him for stuff related to Guns, Snakepit, and VR. 

- Glossed over the VR stuff for the most part. Weiland may have been mentioned a couple times, but his death was barely acknowledged.

- Acknowledged he immediately regretted his HOF speech, which was probably the most adult emotion he showed in the book. Also used the HOF as an opportunity to shit on Slash.

- Was easily the most complimentary of Axl out of all of Guns members. I felt his takes were pretty fair.. he criticized some of the bullshit, but was also quick to give Axl praise. 

- This was definitely on the Anthony Kiedis book level of 'Then I had sex and then I did drugs and then I had sex, etc, etc'. It's hard to tell throughout a lot of the book whether he's trying to brag or it's just an honest reflection. A part of me thinks he's a dude that still completely glamorizes the 'rockstar lifestyle', but he's relatively thoughtful at the end.

 

All in all, I would recommend it for anyone who likes the band enough to be reading a Guns forum. I'd say 70% of the book involves the period from him joining Guns through the end of VR, which I'd imagine is what most on here would be interested in. And, to me, the fact that this is the first band member's book to be released after the reunion, that was interesting. 

I preordered mine a long time ago and can’t wait to get it and read it. Nice review!
 

I wonder if he is changing anything with the book being pushed back to July? 

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On 29/4/2020 at 8:49 AM, adamwolff11 said:

Wow, that's odd! I did. A couple of my takeaways:

- Matt is pretty full of himself.. there's not much humility and he's not super complimentary of most people he mentions. 

- It's obvious his feelings are still very raw about the reunion and he feels he should have been included. He doesn't really have anything positive to say about it. He was invited to play, but offered no money by Fernando.

- His relationship with Duff seems to be pretty affected by it. He mentions Duff thinks Frank sucks, but Axl wants him. Basically shits on how Duff handled the whole thing. Said Slash referred to it as 'just a gig'. 

- I was most shocked by how he has NOTHING positive to say about Slash. Not even being complimentary of his playing. Basically says his whole go with the flow, easy going stuff is an act and he's more cunning than anyone. Shits on him for stuff related to Guns, Snakepit, and VR. 

- Glossed over the VR stuff for the most part. Weiland may have been mentioned a couple times, but his death was barely acknowledged.

- Acknowledged he immediately regretted his HOF speech, which was probably the most adult emotion he showed in the book. Also used the HOF as an opportunity to shit on Slash.

- Was easily the most complimentary of Axl out of all of Guns members. I felt his takes were pretty fair.. he criticized some of the bullshit, but was also quick to give Axl praise. 

- This was definitely on the Anthony Kiedis book level of 'Then I had sex and then I did drugs and then I had sex, etc, etc'. It's hard to tell throughout a lot of the book whether he's trying to brag or it's just an honest reflection. A part of me thinks he's a dude that still completely glamorizes the 'rockstar lifestyle', but he's relatively thoughtful at the end.

 

All in all, I would recommend it for anyone who likes the band enough to be reading a Guns forum. I'd say 70% of the book involves the period from him joining Guns through the end of VR, which I'd imagine is what most on here would be interested in. And, to me, the fact that this is the first band member's book to be released after the reunion, that was interesting. 

Great review 👍

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On 29/04/2020 at 9:49 PM, adamwolff11 said:

Wow, that's odd! I did. A couple of my takeaways:

- Matt is pretty full of himself.. there's not much humility and he's not super complimentary of most people he mentions. 

- It's obvious his feelings are still very raw about the reunion and he feels he should have been included. He doesn't really have anything positive to say about it. He was invited to play, but offered no money by Fernando.

- His relationship with Duff seems to be pretty affected by it. He mentions Duff thinks Frank sucks, but Axl wants him. Basically shits on how Duff handled the whole thing. Said Slash referred to it as 'just a gig'. 

- I was most shocked by how he has NOTHING positive to say about Slash. Not even being complimentary of his playing. Basically says his whole go with the flow, easy going stuff is an act and he's more cunning than anyone. Shits on him for stuff related to Guns, Snakepit, and VR. 

- Glossed over the VR stuff for the most part. Weiland may have been mentioned a couple times, but his death was barely acknowledged.

- Acknowledged he immediately regretted his HOF speech, which was probably the most adult emotion he showed in the book. Also used the HOF as an opportunity to shit on Slash.

- Was easily the most complimentary of Axl out of all of Guns members. I felt his takes were pretty fair.. he criticized some of the bullshit, but was also quick to give Axl praise. 

- This was definitely on the Anthony Kiedis book level of 'Then I had sex and then I did drugs and then I had sex, etc, etc'. It's hard to tell throughout a lot of the book whether he's trying to brag or it's just an honest reflection. A part of me thinks he's a dude that still completely glamorizes the 'rockstar lifestyle', but he's relatively thoughtful at the end.

 

All in all, I would recommend it for anyone who likes the band enough to be reading a Guns forum. I'd say 70% of the book involves the period from him joining Guns through the end of VR, which I'd imagine is what most on here would be interested in. And, to me, the fact that this is the first band member's book to be released after the reunion, that was interesting. 

Much on matts time with The Cult?.

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Based on some of the interviews he's given lately it seems like he's pretty comfortable with everything he wrote in the book, so I don't think we'll see any changes.

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6 hours ago, Sydney Fan said:

Much on matts time with The Cult?.

Yeah, maybe 10-15% of the book? I've never listened to them much, so I can't really give any decent feedback on the content. Another situation where he didn't seem super positive on anyone involved, particularly Ian. Wasted potential seemed to be his primary feedback. He's nicer about Billy, but I think he resented that the band was basically them and he was on a different tier.

It's weird, because the last chapter or so of the book is kind of him being married, happy, sober, appreciative.. those sorts of emotions. But none of that is represented throughout the book. I guess I appreciate that he didn't feel the need to suck up to people and, given the sheer amount of criticism, gave his honest feedback. Off the top of my head, he was very complimentary of Lemmy and Billy Gibbons. There were probably a few others, but those are the only ones I remember that he painted in a very positive light.

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12 minutes ago, adamwolff11 said:

I think he resented that the band was basically them and he was on a different tier.

And then the same thing happened with Hollywood Vampires.

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44 minutes ago, MaskingApathy said:

And then the same thing happened with Hollywood Vampires.

Absolutely.. and actually, that's kind of a theme:

- He felt mad and slighted by Tori Amos because he said he put the band together and he ended up as just a session musician.

- Slash fucked him out of song writing credits or something, I forget exactly, but he didn't get enough of the pie there.

- He didn't buy Slash's excuse for why Snakepit became Slash's Snakepit and was mad it was his solo project and less of a band.

 

Plus the already discussed Cult and Hollywood Vampires examples. He's obviously got a very high opinion of himself, but he also seems to nearly exclusively work with huge stars and then wonder why he isn't perceived on the same level as they are!

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1 hour ago, adamwolff11 said:

Yeah, maybe 10-15% of the book? I've never listened to them much, so I can't really give any decent feedback on the content. Another situation where he didn't seem super positive on anyone involved, particularly Ian. Wasted potential seemed to be his primary feedback. He's nicer about Billy, but I think he resented that the band was basically them and he was on a different tier.

It's weird, because the last chapter or so of the book is kind of him being married, happy, sober, appreciative.. those sorts of emotions. But none of that is represented throughout the book. I guess I appreciate that he didn't feel the need to suck up to people and, given the sheer amount of criticism, gave his honest feedback. Off the top of my head, he was very complimentary of Lemmy and Billy Gibbons. There were probably a few others, but those are the only ones I remember that he painted in a very positive light.

Wasted potential on Astbury's part? That seems weird, he's had a very solid career. 

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In GnR Matt was promoted as a full-fledged band member and not as a side guy like in the Cult, but he was never made a partner (same goes for Dizzy, Gilby and all the nuGnR guys later). Does he mention anything about that in the book? Or about the "additional musician" thing on the credits of Live Era?

And since, from what the people who have read the book say, he doesn't say much about the VR era, I assume there isn't anything about Slash's night visit at Axl's house and what it caused in VR.

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5 minutes ago, lame ass security said:

Wasted potential on Astbury's part? That seems weird, he's had a very solid career. 

I think it was mostly that he definitely had a solid career, but it could have been a legendary career. At one point he compares him to someone, I believe Steven Tyler, saying like.. that was what Astbury could be. Most of it was around his appearance and gaining weight. I honestly haven't followed them at all, so I'm not sure if his weight is a regularly discussed topic, but we know how prevalent something a topic like the singer's weight can be to fans :)

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Actually out of curiosity, I went and found the quote. Here's what he said.. this was during the Cult touring with Aerosmith (when he had rejoined the band):

Billy and I went out to watch Aerosmith play that evening, and before we headed back to our bus, I said, "Wouldn't it be amazing have a singer like that?" The thing was, Ian could have been great if only he'd stopped destroying himself and singing about horses and butterflies - if only he'd written lyrics people could actually understand in America. With both him and another singer I would soon work with, that was the main issue. These guys could sing, but they were their own downfall. They sabotaged their potential with drugs and insecurities. It was super frustrating, and as far as Ian was concerned, he had also started to get fat again by the end of the tour.

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Posted (edited)

The same Matt Sorum

who jumped at the chance of turning Guns demos into Snakepit songs, only to side with Axl over Slash when Snakepit became an issue with the Guns camp.

who came to tee-total Guns rehearsals with a drink, hoping to spark a response, and valiantly stormed out after some Slash-related shouting with Axl & Paul Tobias.

who self-admittedly reached out to the Guns camp numerous times since, asking to be let back in, while continuing his off the cuff public remarks about Axl. 


now feels burned for being left out of the reunion. Too bad for Matt, Axl always liked his drumming. Had Matt played along like Dizzy, he could've been on CD. And NITL.

Edited by denin
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8 minutes ago, adamwolff11 said:

I think it was mostly that he definitely had a solid career, but it could have been a legendary career. At one point he compares him to someone, I believe Steven Tyler, saying like.. that was what Astbury could be. Most of it was around his appearance and gaining weight. I honestly haven't followed them at all, so I'm not sure if his weight is a regularly discussed topic, but we know how prevalent something a topic like the singer's weight can be to fans :)

I haven't particularly followed their later career either. From some videos I've seen, Ian had gained a lot of weight around 2009 (more than Axl ever has), but lost most of it later. I guess it was discussed among the fans at the time. There were some nasty comments under the videos, but I think not as many and as much as the respective comments about Axl's weight.

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11 minutes ago, Blackstar said:

In GnR Matt was promoted as a full-fledged band member and not as a side guy like in the Cult, but he was never made a partner (same goes for Dizzy, Gilby and all the nuGnR guys later). Does he mention anything about that in the book? Or about the "additional musician" thing on the credits of Live Era?

And since, from what the people who have read the book say, he doesn't say much about the VR era, I assume there isn't anything about Slash's night visit at Axl's house and what it caused in VR.

So, he addresses all of that a bit when he is quitting the band. This is right after he blows up and tells Paul Huge to fuck off:

Up until that point, I'd been given $15,000 a month (which was deducted from my royalties and the return on my percentage). The letter said the band would buy me out for $75,000. Even now, I don't know why I agreed to it. My contract said the money I was earning would be deducted from my royalties on the next record, so technically I owed the guys money for those four years when nothing happened. 

In any case, I signed, and they recouped the money from the Use Your Illusion records. That really fucked me up, because it took them a long time to do it. I mean, I didn't receive any royalties for years after that. I could've said "I'm not fucking signing it", but I didn't. I didn't even get a penny when the double live album came out; even though I played on 90 percent of the record, they screwed me on my royalty. Axl actually removed my name from the sleeve - or, more accurately, just put me down as a session musician. The only reason he did it is because I stood up to him that day. I don't regret it though. I was done tiptoeing around him. 

And you're correct, no mention of the night at Axl's house.

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1 hour ago, adamwolff11 said:

So, he addresses all of that a bit when he is quitting the band. This is right after he blows up and tells Paul Huge to fuck off:

Up until that point, I'd been given $15,000 a month (which was deducted from my royalties and the return on my percentage). The letter said the band would buy me out for $75,000. Even now, I don't know why I agreed to it. My contract said the money I was earning would be deducted from my royalties on the next record, so technically I owed the guys money for those four years when nothing happened. 

In any case, I signed, and they recouped the money from the Use Your Illusion records. That really fucked me up, because it took them a long time to do it. I mean, I didn't receive any royalties for years after that. I could've said "I'm not fucking signing it", but I didn't. I didn't even get a penny when the double live album came out; even though I played on 90 percent of the record, they screwed me on my royalty. Axl actually removed my name from the sleeve - or, more accurately, just put me down as a session musician. The only reason he did it is because I stood up to him that day. I don't regret it though. I was done tiptoeing around him. 

And you're correct, no mention of the night at Axl's house.

Thanks!

So I guess Dizzy and Gilby didn't get any royalties from Live Era either, as they too were listed as additional musicians.

At the time Matt had said that it was because he had talked to the press about Axl's visits in Sedona. 

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Did matt said anything about the time he and Axl had a few drinks in mid 2000s and apparently mended fences??

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Walapino said:

Did matt said anything about the time he and Axl had a few drinks in mid 2000s and apparently mended fences??

Nothing at all about that encounter

Also, I really didn’t understand how he got fucked on Live Era. If he had actual publishing royalties on the UYI songs, then he could have sued for that. So maybe he didn’t get mechanical royalties? In any event, it didn’t sell that well at the time anyway.

Edited by LunsJail

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10 minutes ago, LunsJail said:

Nothing at all about that encounter

Also, I really didn’t understand how he got fucked on Live Era. If he had actual publishing royalties on the UYI songs, then he could have sued for that. So maybe he didn’t get mechanical royalties? In any event, it didn’t sell that well at the time anyway.

Yeah, tbh I don't quite understand this part either. It seems that he didn't have publishing royalties from the Illusions but there was an arrangement to give him a percentage off the sales (it's not clear from the quote if that arrangement was originally only for the "next record" or for the Illusions, too). Maybe he means he didn't get that percentage off Live Era.

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2 minutes ago, Blackstar said:

Yeah, tbh I don't quite understand this part either. It seems that he didn't have publishing royalties from the Illusions but there was an arrangement to give him a percentage off the sales (it's not clear from the quote if that arrangement was originally only for the "next record" or for the Illusions, too). Maybe he means he didn't get that percentage off Live Era.

So there are publishing royalties which means you have a songwriting credit. Then there are mechanical royalties which means you played on the actual recording. I assume he meant he got screwed out of the mechanical since he was listed as “Additional Musician.”

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