Jump to content
Original

Duff McKagan defends misunderstood '80s lyrics

Recommended Posts

Perhaps for this reason Axl don't like give interviews. But call my attention that Slash rarely the interviewers to ask about this topics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Duff should have been honest,

The place they were at as young men, in a rock band, decadence and debauchery around; this (It's So Easy) wasn't meant to be song that shows the bands commentary on the relationships or structures that existed back then, it was either an embracement of that life, or just a glimpse into it. And that's fine with me. Backtracking for the sake of itself, rather than be honest and saying "That's what we were like, that's the lifestyle we lived, and it was blank (wrong, whatever, etc.)." is far more disingenuous and dishonest.  

  • Like 3
  • GNFNR 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It also looks as all he wanted was to throw a dart at Trump and he came up with this sorry ass shit.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, RussTCB said:

I just need to check something real quick:

 

Absolutely not one person on Earth believes Duffs line of BS about this, right? 

Lyndsey Parker does (the lady interviewing him). Probably.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, MaskingApathy said:

Lyndsey Parker does (the lady interviewing him). Probably.

Dammit lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, RussTCB said:

Dammit lol

Just a guess.

It's not much different than Nikki Sixx denying that the rape story in the Dirt happened.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, action said:

"turn around bitch I got a use for you" is as sexist a lyric as I ever heard, but I have no problem with that. it was meant to provoke and to have a laugh, not being taken literally and that's how I hear them.

But this twisting and turning and "it was misunderstood" nonsense is token of the PC culture we live in today.

In the light of this, I don't think Duff is best placed to write a song dedicated to the metoo movement. it's dishonest, cringeworthy and reeking of hypocrisy.

Just be a man and stand by what you say, don't go twisting your own words in order to please some SJW's. You meant nothing wrong with that line, so don't go acting as if you did anything wrong.

I think having had a long, healthy relationship, two daughters, and growing older definitely gives a human being a different perspective on life. I don't think there's a need to defend old r&r lyrics or try to deflect by discussing Trump's famous line, which in itself I think was taken out of context. But I don't think Duff's new material is cringeworthy. I like it.

 

That said, it's disappointing he kept deflecting and saying "we didn't hang out with guys like that" and tried to absolve himself completely of the era. It's better to just say they were young and it was a different time and they view the world differently now. It's more genuine that way.

Edited by GnR Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy reading fans calling out Duff on this BS. He also said OIAM was written in the 3rd person. This is what happens in PC world.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, 31illusions said:

I enjoy reading fans calling out Duff on this BS. He also said OIAM was written in the 3rd person. This is what happens in PC world.

I do think OIAM was written as a narrative about a small-town kid being culture-shocked in a big city. That was going from Indy to LA. The final verse even says for radicals and racists not to point their fingers. Not that it makes up for the language in the earlier verses.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Oldest Goat said:

How do you mean? 

I suppose we're all hypocrites somehow. I do nothing to help the starving kids in Africa for example even though it breaks my heart. The difference is I don't go around giving phony interviews being a hypocrite saying silly mental gymnastics like "Oh fuck yeah I'm such a good guy because I 'could' help the Africans." :lol:

Never meet your heroes or better yet - have no heroes. Disappointing. They're probably all a pack of cunts or were at times in the past at least.

And personally, I don't care much for the artist's intended meaning with lyrics or whatever it is, not beyond a fleeting curiosity. 

P.S. Just remembered Duff wrote a book 'How to be a Man' lol. 

I don't have a problem with the lyrics either. I've never had, with the exception of OIAM - and even that I've kind of overcome now. Lyrics are an expression and can be written from one's perspective or someone else's; or they can be a description of what the narrator sees. So I don't really mind whatever interpretation Duff is trying to give to the lyrics.

I have a problem with the things these guys did though. They had behaved in a certain way in an environment that was very sexist, and it's idiotic to try to gloss it over or twist it now and almost say that they were feminists.

  • Like 3
  • GNFNR 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now I'm just plain angry that I used to like this guy...

Duff McKagan: HOW TO BE A SISSY (and other delusions)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are so worried about backlash from the PC police. One in a Million doesn't exist!!! Give it a rest, pussies. Your songs are too popular. Nobody cares that Axl was a racist or that every member in the band treated women like shit. We just want to hear you play Welcome to the Jungle and have a reason to party one more time. I'm NOT looking for a lesson on intersectional feminism. Just play the hits and maybe write a few new ones. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, -W.A.R- said:

Back Off (The) Bitch was about animal cruelty.

I had ''Get in the Ring'' as an endorsement for homosexual sex but thought it was rather crude, even for my standards. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Blackstar said:

I don't have a problem with the lyrics either. I've never had, with the exception of OIAM - and even that I've kind of overcome now. Lyrics are an expression and can be written from one's perspective or someone else's; or they can be a description of what the narrator sees. So I don't really mind whatever interpretation Duff is trying to give to the lyrics.

I have a problem with the things these guys did though. They had behaved in a certain way in an environment that was very sexist, and it's idiotic to try to gloss it over or twist it now and almost say that they were feminists.

Cornchucker is about women's sexual freedom.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Oldest Goat said:

Cornchucker is about women's sexual freedom.

Oh I forgot about that. Yes, this is coming from the guy who wrote Cornshucker.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I have never, ever heard One in a Million defended in the context of the story being told from the POV of a fictional character in all the years of defenses of that song. The defense *may* be plausible if the first time we heard it wasn't 30 years after the song's release. I could be wrong, though, and it had been brought up before.

 

As for the misogynism in the lyrics, how hard is it to say "yeah, it was tongue in cheek, and even given how different things were back then, we were morons and should have known better nonetheless."

 

What a load of nonsense coming from perhaps the person with the most sense in the band's history.

Edited by TeeJay410

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TeeJay410 said:

As for the misogynism in the lyrics, how hard is it to say "yeah, it was tongue in cheek, and even given how different things were back then, we were morons and should have known better nonetheless."

 

If you give this reasoning, then you open yourself up to criticism for continuing to play those songs in concert. I, for one, don't want GNR to stop playing "It's So Easy."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I don't remember anybody I hung out with using the N-word, or using the C-word."

 

Bruh, you were in a band with Steve Jones.

Just now, GnR Chris said:

If you give this reasoning, then you open yourself up to criticism for continuing to play those songs in concert. I, for one, don't want GNR to stop playing "It's So Easy."

I don't necessarily agree. Jay-Z wrote in his book saying that in his current age he couldn't believe some of the lyrics he wrote, particularly Big Pimpin'. He still plays the song.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Not only is there no new music to speak of, now it's active revisionism to please pc culture full on.

The more I see from the "reunion", the more I miss the CD years. What a joke this brand has become.

Edited by adamsapple

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
49 minutes ago, TeeJay410 said:

I have never, ever heard One in a Million defended in the context of the story being told from the POV of a fictional character in all the years of defenses of that song. The defense *may* be plausible if the first time we heard it wasn't 30 years after the song's release. I could be wrong, though, and it had been brought up before.

Nah Duff has being saying that for years but that doesn't make him any less full of shit.

There is a section on the Lies cover that summarizes incidents that lead to the song. Axl has also spoke during concerts about some of the incidents, and its even depicted in the WTTJ video - when Axl gets off the bus, Izzy comes up trying to sell him something ("Don't need to buy none of your gold chains today"). When he was defending the song he never mentioned anything about it being 3rd person. Plus we all know Axl had problems with the Police, so that line makes sense from his perspective.

I don't think Axl is racist/homophobic but he suffered some bad culture shock arriving in LA. That song was him lashing out. 

Edited by -W.A.R-
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what I loved about Motley Crue's 'The Dirt'. They embraced it. Not because they behave that way now, but because that was them. The owned it for all of its highs and lows.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×